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Re: Raphidophora vs. Monstera - or maybe neither?

  • To: Multiple recipients of list AROID-L <aroid-l@mobot.org>
  • Subject: Re: Raphidophora vs. Monstera - or maybe neither?
  • From: GeoffAroid@aol.com
  • Date: Wed, 14 Jun 2000 18:50:08 -0500 (CDT)

In a message dated 14/6/00 10:37:42 pm, p.boyce@rbgkew.org.uk writes:

<< This is fascinating - I assuemt that while not fitting a genus in the
Monstereae that the inflorescences are right for the family? Does
anyone have a pic of this thing is flower? >>

Peter,

If Hans Hvissers in Amsterdam is listening in (he often is I know) he might
be the one to ask to check, he has a wall and base of a large tank absolutely
covered in the thing, my pieces are too new and only just established I think
to flower (but be sure I will be checking.....). I dont think Hans has let
any of his material race upwards and produce mature leaves (or perhaps these
ARE the mature leaves!), the largest leaves I saw on his plants were about
4-5inches across and still looked the same as in my pics. As you say, a
fascinating puzzle and one which I am sure we can get to the bottom of.

On a separate topic, can you tell me why there are no intergeneric hybrids in
the Araceae? Or is that incorrect? If it is correct is this just because nobod
y has tried or do the genera really have that much of a genetic barrier. It
seems so odd since hardly any other family I can think of has such rigid
barriers, either genetic, physical or otherwise.

Many thanks,
Geoffrey







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