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Re: Chaos in Monstera names

  • Subject: Re: Chaos in Monstera names
  • From: <ju-bo@msn.com>
  • Date: Sat, 28 Jun 2008 15:12:25 +0000



________________________________
> Date: Fri, 27 Jun 2008 15:52:43 -0500
> From: Thomas.Croat@mobot.org
> To: aroid-l@gizmoworks.com
> Subject: Re: [Aroid-l] Chaos in Monstera names
 
Dear Tom and Friends,

I do think that "Monstera" pertusa is a species of Rahpidophora.
I recently ran into what I THINK may be this plant being used as an interior decorative planting in the large office of a landscape architect, and it initally ''threw me for a loop'', and I told the guy it was a small example of Monstera deliciosa.  I then took a closer look, and I don`t believe that it was Monstera deliciosa.  I think what it was is this Raphidophora sp.   It could easily be mistaken for a Monstera species close to M. deliciosa.   
Remember on this list, a while ago, it was mentioned that M. deliciosa actually existed in the wilds of coastal Mexico in two or more ''forms'', the giant one (of which all plants now in cultivation was from) was from just a few collections, and that in the wild a smaller, much commoner but recognisable form of this same species was the common  plant one encountered?? I wonder if someone could confirm this story.
The Best,

Julius
> Marek:
> 
>             Monstera friedrichsthalii is a synonym of A. adansonii but M. pertusa is not even a Monstera as I recall but rather a Rhapidophora (Pete is this not correct?). M. karwinskyi is a synonym of M. acuminate, not the other way around.  M. obliqua has lots of synonyms.  Madison lists 7 including M. expilata Schott but I intend to resurrect the latter.
> 
> 
> 
> Tom
> 
> 
> 
> ________________________________
> 
> From: aroid-l-bounces@gizmoworks.com [mailto:aroid-l-bounces@gizmoworks.com] On Behalf Of Marek Argent
> Sent: Wednesday, June 25, 2008 12:13 PM
> To: Discussion of aroids
> Subject: [Aroid-l] Chaos in Monstera names
> 
> 
> 
> Hello,
> 
> 
> 
> Can anyone authoritatively tell if:
> 
> 
> 
> M. friedrichsthalii = M. adansonii = M. pertusa
> 
> 
> 
> M. acuminata = M. karwinskyi
> 
> 
> 
> M. obliqua has no synonyms
> 
> 
> 
> Best
> 
> Marek
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