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Re: Aroid hardiness

  • Subject: Re: Aroid hardiness
  • From: Piabinha@aol.com
  • Date: Thu, 21 Mar 2002 20:59:52 -0600 (CST)

In a message dated Thu, 21 Mar 2002 11:10:01 AM Eastern Standard Time, "James W. Waddick" <jwaddick@kc.rr.com> writes:

>      I can't emphasize enough how important provenance is to 
> gardeners such as myself who try to grow tender plants in cold 
> climates. Too often plants in cultivation come from only a single or 
> few introductions. I hope you'll try these two new accessions around 
> the country.

i'm always somewhat surprised by what survives our winters here in nyc.  i mean, i can understand a south african bulb or Pelargonium surviving freezing winters, but then i hear of tropical plants like Alstroemeria psittacina (pulchella), which i tried in my parents' garden and it thrived for several winters, even producing seed.  this plant i believe is from brazil (granted, southern brazil but still not an area that experiences hard ground frosts).  also, i'm told the Philippine Lilium formosanum is hardy, and that's a truly tropical plant (tony, correct me here if i'm wrong).  now i'm told by some friends that they have forgotten Alocasias and Sinningias they planted outside, and they came through unscathed.  

tsuh yang





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