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RE: Aroids growing better in water?

  • Subject: RE: Aroids growing better in water?
  • From: Ron McHatton <rmchatton@photocircuits.com>
  • Date: Tue, 28 May 2002 16:24:02 -0500 (CDT)

It is indeed possible to grow Phalaenopsis (as well as virtually any other 
orchid for that matter) hydroponically.  The key is "hydroponically." 
 Plants grown in that manner are not grown in water but rather in an inert 
medium which can be flushed regularly with water or they are grown in pots 
which allow the roots to grow down into a water reservoir similar to the 
growing situation described by Julius for some emergent aroids.  In this 
situation, the Phalaenopsis roots grow down through the potting mix, 
through the gravel at the bottom of the pot and into the container of 
water.  The roots appear to change structure (they will be fatter and fewer 
in number) and they will adapt to growing under water.  The only time this 
becomes deadly is if the entire root system is kept under water.  In that 
case, the plants will die rapidly.  Many Phragmipedium growers use a 
technique similar to Julius' using tall pots standing in an inch or two of 
water.  Southeast Asian Vanda growers routinely suspend their plants in 
baskets with no potting medium, allowing the long roots to grow down into a 
trough of manure tea.  The plants get constant moisture and fertilizer 
uptake through the submerged roots, the exposed portion of the root mass 
apparently handles oxygen uptake and the plants grow at a tremendous rate.

-----Original Message-----
From:	ron [SMTP:ronlene@adelphia.net]
Sent:	Tuesday, May 28, 2002 4:22 PM
To:	Multiple recipients of list AROID-L
Subject:	Re: Aroids growing better in water?

Phalanopsis cannot sit in water and live very long!!! I hope nobody took 
you literally.

----- Original Message -----
From: Randall M. Story <mailto:story@caltech.edu>
To: Multiple recipients of list AROID-L <mailto:aroid-l@mobot.org>
Sent: Tuesday, May 28, 2002 12:04 AM
Subject: Re: Aroids growing better in water?

Even epiphytic orchids, apparently.  I saw several yesterday at a 
friend's--including a Phalaenopsis!

Randy

----------
From: Neil Carroll < zzamia@hargray.com <mailto:zzamia@hargray.com>>
To: Multiple recipients of list AROID-L < aroid-l@mobot.org 
<mailto:aroid-l@mobot.org>>
Subject: Re: Aroids growing better in water?
Date: Mon, May 27, 2002, 6:30 PM




I would venture to say that just about ANY plant can be grown in water 
(hydroponically).
 
Neil
 


----- Original Message -----
From: Ron Iles <mailto:roniles@eircom.net>  
To: Multiple recipients of list AROID-L <mailto:aroid-l@mobot.org>  
Sent: Friday, May 24, 2002 2:24 PM
Subject: Re: Aroids growing better in water?

 




Folks!


 


I am still wondering....!


 


Put simply:


 


What terrestrial aroid species have you found to grow as well or better in 
water?  


 


Ron








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