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Re: [Aroid-l] Determining Amorphophallus storage needs


Hi John and other peoples,

I cannot confirm your observation. In fact I have noticed quite the
opposite. In my collection, the ones that need continuous soil and/or
watering always have roots spread all over the tuber that usually are
healthy when the leaf has already died down. The ones that need dry
conditions and have lost their leaves, are usually also without roots or
have dead or dying roots. 

My experience and that of others written to me, have changed my views on
dormancy issues in Amorphophallus quite dramatically over the years since my
publication with Ittenbach in Vol. 19 of Aroideana. 

Generally it seems that species from (West-)Central Africa, West Malaysia,
Borneo, Java, Sumatra, S. & SE China and N. Vietnam need to be kept in soil
all the time. They tend to have rather short dormancies or nearly none at
all. They are from very wet areas (everwet tropical). During growth they can
hardly be "overloaded" with water during watergift. Species for which this
works good are:

angolensis
angulatus
annulifer
bangkokensis
baumannii
beccarii
borneensis
boyceanus
brachyphyllus
bufo
coaetaneus
costatus
croatii
decus-silvae
discophorus
dzuii
eburneus
eichleri
elegans
excentricus (is also quite drought resistant)
galbra
gigas
glossophyllus (also quite drought resistant)
hayi
hetterscheidii
hewittii
hirsutus
hottae
infundibuliformis
interruptus (also quite drought resistant)
julaihii
koratensis (when young)
lambii
manta
myosuroides
ochroleucus
opertus
palawanensis (can also be stored dry)
pendulus
prainii
preussii
rhizomatosus
rugosus
sagittarius
scaber (only when young)
sinuatus
sparsiflorus
spectabilis
staudtii
subpedatus
tinekeae
titanum
tonkinensis
tuberculatus
venustus
verticillatus
zenkeri

Unfortunately, this behaviour makes them the more difficult species to grow
(except the ones from N. Vietnam, S. & SE China and A. hottae). The ones
that have a prolongued dormancy are usually the stronger ones in cultivation
and need less humid conditions.

Then the smallest of species also appreciate not to be bone dry but they
must also be watered carefully and not become too wet. They too tend to have
hardly any appreciable dormancy and flower immediately after leaf shed or
alongside mature leaves:

myosuroides
obscurus
ongsakulii
polyanthus
pusillus
serrulatus

I think Tony Avent and Alan galloway may have plans to pubblish on this. In
case the IAS board decides to reprint vol. 19, I will add a text on this
subject as introduction.

Of course it may be that under local circumstances at individual people's
places, plants may have a deviating behaviour. But this is merely a general
directive.

Cheerio,
Wilbert



> -----Oorspronkelijk bericht-----
> Van: aroid-l-bounces@gizmoworks.com 
> [mailto:aroid-l-bounces@gizmoworks.com] Namens John Ludwig
> Verzonden: vrijdag 31 augustus 2007 11:39
> Aan: Discussion of aroids
> Onderwerp: [Aroid-l] Determining Amorphophallus storage needs
> 
> 
> I have noticed one similarity in determining a tuber's need 
> to be stored in soil or dry.  I have noticed that the tubers 
> that need storage in soil are predominantly the ones that 
> grow their roots from the top of the tuber.
> 
> Is this a correct observation and can I apply this rule of 
> thumb to all Amorph's?
> 
> Are there exceptions that I am currently unaware of?
> 
> I have also noticed that all of the ones that I can store dry 
> seem to have a smooth skin that seem to be shiny\waxy in appearance.
> 
> I have also weighed my tubers to see if they have been losing 
> weight due to dessication.
> 
> When a new species is discovered, How are it's needs determined?
> _______________________________________________
> Aroid-L mailing list
> Aroid-L@www.gizmoworks.com
> http://www.gizmoworks.com/mailman/listinfo/aroid-l
> 

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