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Re: Apples and Cherrie pests

  • Subject: Re: [cg] Apples and Cherrie pests
  • From: Pat_Elazar@cwb.ca
  • Date: Mon, 22 Apr 2002 15:23:06 -0500
  • Sensitivity:


The pest you briefly described could be either Coddling Moth or Plum
Curculio. Both infest apple & cherry in your beautiful Ozark foothills
area. Both could be the "worm-in-the-apple" you've encountered & both are
devastating, tough to deal with pests. Probably your local county extension
rep can give the most locally relevant advice. Just insist on strictly
organic remedies if thats what you want. Here are some links to some
background material that I found. (Sorry, nothing from UofA in
Fayatteville, but Missou is close!)
http://agebb.missouri.edu/mac/agopp/arc/agopp029.txt

"Organic apple production remains extremely difficult in MO, while
demand for  high-quality organically-grown fruit continues to
increase.  Conventional  apple production typically requires as many
as 17 applications of pesticides  annually that still do not always
provide adequate pest control. Organic as  well as conventional
apple growers could benefit by integrating particle  film
technologies into their overall pest management programs..."


"The technique of using kaolin particle films to control certain crop
pests  has been recently developed and patented by Drs. Michael
Glenn and Gary  Puterka of the US Department of Agriculture.  Fine
kaolin films sprayed onto  leaves and fruit form a protective
barrier that repels many insects and  mites simply by irritating or
confusing them, while also confounding the  infection mechanisms of
certain fungal and bacterial pathogens.  Preliminary  research by
the USDA has shown that kaolin particle films can help control  many
important apple insect pests (coddling moth, plum curculio, aphids,
apple maggots, leafhoppers, thrips, pear psylla, Japanese beetles),
mites  (rust mites, spider mites, red mites), and diseases
(flyspeck, apple scab,  sooty blotch, fire blight)..."


This is a long (27p) Adobe reader doc from ATTRA (appropriate technology transfer for rural areas) with good
sections on Coddling Moth & Plum Curculio.   http://www.attra.org/attra-pub/PDF/apple.pdf

Please remember that organic solutions are often preventitive (site selection; rotation; soil preparation; cultivar selection).
Dont forget to apply meticulous sanitation & use the dormant oil sprays that are allowable as organic practice in your area.

good luck!




"Teresa Kohut" <treebone7@hotmail.com>@mallorn.com on 04/21/2002 11:20:49
AM

Sent by:    community_garden-admin@mallorn.com


To:    community_garden@mallorn.com
cc:
Subject:    [cg] Apples and Cherries


I have an apple tree and some cherry trees, last year I got moths real bad
on both. Their larva infested the whole crop. The apples had dark brown to
black splotches on the apples. Both looked beautiful before they got
attacked. Is there anything organically I can do so I can get some fruit
this year?

Thanks
Teresa Kohut
Fayetteville,AR



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