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Cutting Costs in the Garden

  • Subject: [cg] Cutting Costs in the Garden
  • From: "Jim Call" jimcall@casagarden.com
  • Date: Wed, 23 Apr 2003 20:20:05 -0500

Yeah, you guys are going to love this.
Speaking of using materials in the garden that "cut costs", here are a few
items.

Wood Chips - for garden paths only (not in actual garden, nitrogen sucking
medium) - Delivered free to the     garden from a tree service who is on
contract with the city to mainly trim trees (helps keep the lights on during
those ice storms).  I've given them instructions to dump only "clean chips"
and not ones which includes limbs.

Leaf Mulch - Our garden is located next to the city's leaf pickup storage
area (a stone's throw from the garden).  They deliver (using a front loader)
great leaf mulch to the garden.

New this year - Believe it or not, we have actually started visiting the
local funeral homes .   You see, traditionally in the South, after the
graveside funeral service, the flowers from the wreaths are taken from their
metal stands (trianglar) and thrown onto the casket, then buried.  After the
family leaves, the funeral home workers gather up all the metal stands and
take them back to the funeral home where they throw them away in their
dumpster.  We have one funeral home that actually places them next to their
dumpster (if we call to arrange it) so we can just drive by and pick them
up.  Anyway, this year, we used a vise to straighten out the main stand
support.  When straighten, its about 8' long.  They work great for
supporting floating row covers.  We hope to find other uses for them as well
(maybe small garden banner supports).

Soon, I hope to have pictures of our "mini-planters" for the garden this
year.   The city had about 60' of 12" plastic corrugated perforated pipes
left over from their garden drainage project.  We are cutting them up into
small sections to make "mini-planters".  Details at 11.

Anyway, these are some of the "free" items that can be used in the garden.

I guess in my case, growing up poor in the south sometimes has its
advantages.

Maybe next year, someone needs to conduct a session on "Cutting Costs in The
Garden" at the ACGA Conference.  This session would probably have good
attendence.

Kindest regards,  Jim Call,  CASA Community Garden Volunteer Dir.

----- Original Message -----
From: "Tamsin Salehian" <tamsin@sparecreative.com>
To: <jimcall@mail.casagarden.com>; <community_garden@mallorn.com>; "Skyler
York" <skylery@shfoodbank.org>
Sent: Wednesday, April 23, 2003 6:38 PM
Subject: Re: [cg] Wood to be used in a community garden.


> Hi all,
> Great discussion. Some friends of mine use old bicycle wheels mounted at
the
> axel on top of posts and grow climbers over these which adds an
interesting
> structure to the garden. I grew plants up both metal and bamboo last year
> and found that the bamboo was more successful - plants weren't as
interested
> in climbing up the metal - especially peas and I thought it may have
> something to do with the metal getting hot as we have erratic summers with
> some days over 100 degrees F and others down at 68F. Metal is a great long
> term solution though - any thoughts? The twining plants were happier on
> metal than plants which wanted to grab a hold.
>
> I grew cucumbers both on vertical metal wire structures (at an angle)
which
> had been plastic coated (so didn't get hot/ I found them in a dump so I am
> not sure what they were for but I think old clothes horses would do really
> well) and on the ground over straw. The vertical plants produced about 3
> times as many cucumbers and they had lovely fat even shapes, the ground
ones
> weren't as happy.
>
> Personally I like using a mixture of materials in my plot (using wood and
> sending it to the compost heap as it rots, found metal structures - I
think
> I'll try and paint some bright colours next season so that there is some
> colour before the plants grow up) but this may be because my garden is
small
> and I donšt need too many pieces. I'd love to hear about any other
> interesting designs or uses for recycling materials to make garden
> structures.
> Tamsin
> Melbourne
>
> On 23/4/03 6:08 AM, "Jim  Call" <jimcall@mail.casagarden.com> wrote:
>
> > My suggestion in using wood is...
> >
> > If its going to be "planted" in the ground such as posts for pole beans
or
> > such, I say use something else.  In other words, if its a garden fixture
that
> > is used over and over every year, use metal (T-posts).
>
>
> ______________________________________________________
> The American Community Gardening Association listserve is only one of
ACGA's services to community gardeners. To learn more about the ACGA and to
find out how to join, please go to http://www.communitygarden.org
>
>
> To post an e-mail to the list:  community_garden@mallorn.com
>
> To subscribe, unsubscribe or change your subscription:
https://secure.mallorn.com/mailman/listinfo/community_garden
>
>


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______________________________________________________
The American Community Gardening Association listserve is only one of ACGA's services to community gardeners. To learn more about the ACGA and to find out how to join, please go to http://www.communitygarden.org


To post an e-mail to the list:  community_garden@mallorn.com

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