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Re: Gardening and Microenterprise


One of my visions in helping the youth in our community is to teach them about gardening, business and how to give back to the community.  When I get some time, maybe after this year's harvest, I plan to propose the following to a church that has land for expansion.

Here's the deal and you heard it here folks.  

I propose working with the youth of a church to plant tomatoes and sell them.  The first year, tomatoes only because they are easy to grow.  Prior to spring, I would work with them (free of charge) to lay out this garden, say 100 plants, build cages (out of reinforced concrete wire) and prep the garden area.  The funding required would either be donated to this Youth Project by their church or loaned to them. We would have a Plant Day and we would plant the tomatoes, mulch and install the cages (maybe plant a few scarecrows as well).  They can either water it on a regular basis or have it on a timer.  I would drop by weekly to oversee the garden and give advice.

During the harvest season, they could sell the tomatoes for 3 for buck prior to or after church services or Saturdays in their parking lot.  You've seen those girls standing on the side of the road wearing swimsuits for car washes, hey, what about a big red tomato dancing on the side of the road to get attention (sorry, going crazy here).  

In the south, there is no doubt they would sell like hotcakes.  Everyone loves homegrown maters (southern for tomatoes).  Those attending the church would definitely support their youth being involved in this project.  In fact, the church may benefit by getting new members by way of those coming to the church to buy the tomatoes. 

In return, I would request that they give 10 % of their profits to the church and 10 % of their harvest to the needy (Homeless shelter, Senior Ctr or otherwise). 

This program would teach kids about gardening, give them some spending money and benefit those less fortunate.  One of the most important features of this program is that it instills in our youth the true meaning of giving. 

Hope this helps,  Jim Call, CASA Community Garden Volunteer Director
                            Visionary
                            www.casagarden.com

  



---------- Original Message ----------------------------------
From: Gardenfoolery@aol.com
Date: Wed, 6 Aug 2003 15:04:54 EDT

>Thank you one and all for information regarding my question posed to kids and 
>gardening and schools.
>
>I'd like to take this a little further.  Does anyone have, or know of, 
>programs that use teens in community gardening efforts with a microenterprise bent?  
>What I'm hunting for are the programs that have youth work the gardens and 
>then they either sell their produce or they work with a partner to sell the 
>produce or whatever, but will introduce these kids to the world of business; 
>specifically, how to start and run one.
>
>Thanks again,
>Connie Nelson
>2605 S Davis Rd
>Spokane, WA   99216-0259
>(509) 921-1481 (h)
>gardenfoolery@aol.com
>
>
>______________________________________________________
>The American Community Gardening Association listserve is only one of ACGA's services to community gardeners. To learn more about the ACGA and to find out how to join, please go to http://www.communitygarden.org
>
>
>To post an e-mail to the list:  community_garden@mallorn.com
>
>To subscribe, unsubscribe or change your subscription:  https://secure.mallorn.com/mailman/listinfo/community_garden
>


______________________________________________________
The American Community Gardening Association listserve is only one of ACGA's services to community gardeners. To learn more about the ACGA and to find out how to join, please go to http://www.communitygarden.org


To post an e-mail to the list:  community_garden@mallorn.com

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