hort.net Seasonal photo, (c) 2006 Christopher P. Lindsey, All Rights Reserved: do not copy
articles | gallery of plants | blog | tech blog | plant profiles | patents | mailing lists | top stories | links | shorturl service | tom clothier's archive0
 Navigation
Articles
Gallery of Plants
Blog
Tech Blog
Plant Profiles
Patents
Mailing Lists
    FAQ
    Netiquette
    Search ALL lists
    Search help
    Subscription info
Top Stories
Links
sHORTurl service
Tom Clothier's Archive
 Top Stories
Disease could hit Britain's trees hard

Ten of the best snowdrop cultivars

Plant protein database helps identify plant gene functions

Dendroclimatologists record history through trees

Potato beetle could be thwarted through gene manipulation

Hawaii expands coffee farm quarantine

Study explains flower petal loss

Unauthorized use of a plant doesn't invalidate it's patent

RSS story archive

Re: Re: tilling

  • Subject: Re: [cg] Re: tilling
  • From: "Mike McGrath" MikeMcG@PTD.net
  • Date: Wed, 23 Aug 2006 17:38:53 -0400

I have to largely agree with Ken. I think a site should be tilled and enhanced with compost to start, but there are many benefits to not tilling again after that.
---Mike McG in Philly
----- Original Message ----- From: "Ken Hargesheimer" <minifarms@gmail.com>
To: <community_garden@mallorn.com>
Cc: "ROBERT HARTMAN" <rhartman2003@msn.com>
Sent: Wednesday, August 23, 2006 5:11 PM
Subject: Re: [cg] Re: tilling


There is unlimited documentation that organic, no-till gardening and farming
is right way to produce food. 200,000,000 acres worldwide and increasing
fast, especially in Asia. There is never a good reason to till. Using
this, perpetual cropping is recommended. In fact, the soil is better each
year than the past year.

There is no reason to ever till. There is no reason to use fallowing and
rebalance native microoganisms because no-till does not put them out of
balance. It is the opposite. It is so balanced, the population explodes.

Read two little books by Ruth Stout. Email me to send over a page of
websites, DVDs, documents, etc.

Ken Hargesheimer





For practical purposes that means some form of tillage.

It would be really nice if we could just cut a line, stuff the opening
with
compost, and plant into it, rather than turning soil over. However, the
most practical thing is probably to go back to the system of crop rotation
where every few years a plot is allowed to lie fallow and rebalance its
population of native microorganisms.

All the best,

Robert Hartman

rhartman2003@msn.com

"We are stardust. We are golden." --Joni Mitchell


______________________________________________________
The American Community Gardening Association listserve is only one of
ACGA's services to community gardeners. To learn more about the ACGA and to
find out how to join, please go to http://www.communitygarden.org


To post an e-mail to the list: community_garden@mallorn.com

To subscribe, unsubscribe or change your subscription:
https://secure.mallorn.com/mailman/listinfo/community_garden

______________________________________________________
The American Community Gardening Association listserve is only one of ACGA's services to community gardeners. To learn more about the ACGA and to find out how to join, please go to http://www.communitygarden.org


To post an e-mail to the list: community_garden@mallorn.com

To subscribe, unsubscribe or change your subscription: https://secure.mallorn.com/mailman/listinfo/community_garden

______________________________________________________
The American Community Gardening Association listserve is only one of ACGA's services to community gardeners. To learn more about the ACGA and to find out how to join, please go to http://www.communitygarden.org


To post an e-mail to the list:  community_garden@mallorn.com

To subscribe, unsubscribe or change your subscription:  https://secure.mallorn.com/mailman/listinfo/community_garden





 © 1995-2015 Mallorn Computing, Inc.All Rights Reserved.
Our Privacy Statement
Other Mailing lists | Author Index | Date Index | Subject Index | Thread Index