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Re: Definitions and design


Some qucik responses from Betsy Johnson, Director Garden Futures, Boston
(ACGA Board)
----- Original Message -----
From: Elaine Shen <ejs42@columbia.edu>
To: <community_garden@mallorn.com>
Sent: Thursday, December 07, 2000 12:21 PM
Subject: [cg] Definitions and design


>
Q.   Part of the discussion revealed that the definition of what makes a
> community garden is ambiguous.  For example, if only two tenants are
> running a garden and only those two are allowed entrance, is it a
> community garden?  A.  NO
 Q. On the other hand there is the issue of public/private.  Would you call
a community garden a public space?  A. YES  True community gardens have a
responsibility to provide at least visiting access to others--especially
when gardeners are there; hold events (eg barbecue, workshops) for
neighbors; provide other service to the neighborhood such as donating
produce to shelters, etc.

Q. In some ways, it seems like no.  Many gardens have individual plots and
no
> communal plots.  A. In Boston, all our newly designed and renovated
gardens are being built with much larger community areas, just for this
reason.

Q.  Access may be limited to only those who live in the neighborhood.   Why
are lockable gates such an ubiquitous characteristic of gardens.  What do
you think?  A. THEFT, THEFT, THEFT
>
Q.  Another question I had was how gardens are designed.   There's more
> media about how they get torn down than how they got started.  Do
> gardeners hold a design competition or is there one person who usually
> calls the shots?  WE HAVE COMMUNITY DESIGN SESSIONS

 Q. Do any gardens have design standards that later gardeners have to abide
by?  A. WE PROVIDE GENERAL GUIDELINES/BEST PRACTICES
>



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