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RE: community_garden digest, Vol 1 #1625 - 7 msgs

  • Subject: [cg] RE: community_garden digest, Vol 1 #1625 - 7 msgs
  • From: "Mary Ann Westendorf" mwestendorf@CivicGardenCenter.org
  • Date: Thu, 18 Dec 2003 14:44:05 -0500
  • Content-class: urn:content-classes:message
  • Thread-index: AcPFkRnPH+AVsWQfRuCHAaJT3ZxANAADNxtg
  • Thread-topic: community_garden digest, Vol 1 #1625 - 7 msgs

Hi Marci,

Here in Cincinnati, the Civic Garden Center has helped start over 60
community gardening projects, 24 of which are food producing gardens. Of
the 24 gardens, 16 have raised bed plots and never need tilling. We have
a staff of two and do not offer to till plots for our gardeners.
However, we have two tillers that are available for gardeners to borrow.
This is sometimes hard on equipment, but we give them a quick lesson and
there is usually someone at each garden who knows how to use the
equipment and will till the beds for other gardeners as well.
Eventually, we would like to have raised beds in all of our gardens and
completely eliminate the need for any gas powered equipment - tillers,
weed eaters and mowers. We have an unlimited supply of wood chips for
paths from our local Urban Forestry department, and composting
bins/areas in each garden. Good luck.

Mary Ann Westendorf
Neighborhood Gardens Coordinator
Civic Garden Center of Greater Cincinnati
2715 Reading Rd.
Cincinnati, OH 45206
513.221.0981
Fax 513.221.0961
Visit us on the web: www.civicgardencenter.org (You can purchase your
2004 Bare Roots Gardening Calendar here) 
 
Building Community through Gardening



-----Original Message-----
From: community_garden-admin@mallorn.com
[mailto:community_garden-admin@mallorn.com] 
Sent: Thursday, December 18, 2003 1:01 PM
To: community_garden@mallorn.com
Subject: community_garden digest, Vol 1 #1625 - 7 msgs


Send community_garden mailing list submissions to
	community_garden@mallorn.com

To subscribe or unsubscribe via the web, visit
	https://secure.mallorn.com/mailman/listinfo/community_garden
or, via email, send a message with subject or body 'help' to
	community_garden-request@mallorn.com
You can reach the person managing the list at
	community_garden-admin@mallorn.com

When replying, please edit your Subject line so it is more specific than
"Re: Contents of community_garden digest..."


Today's Topics:

  1. RE: community_garden digest, Vol 1 #1624 - 2 msgs (Kirby, Ellen)
  2. Re: offering tilling as part of community garden services
(adam36055@aol.com)
  3. RE: offering tilling as part of community garden services (Tom
Dietrich)
  4. RE: RE: community_garden digest, Vol 1 #1624 - 2 msgs (Karina
Luboff)
  5. Re: offering tilling as part of community garden services (Alliums)
  6. Re: Re: offering tilling as part of community garden services
(grow19@aol.com)
  7. Re: offering tilling as part of community garden services (Libby J.
Goldstein)

--__--__--

Message: 1
charset="US-ASCII"
Date: Wed, 17 Dec 2003 13:16:19 -0500
From: "Kirby, Ellen" <ellenkirby@bbg.org>
To: <community_garden@mallorn.com>
Subject: [cg] RE: community_garden digest, Vol 1 #1624 - 2 msgs

I'm also very interested in this question.  I think Pa.State has a
program including training manual. It would be great to know of other
such programs. Is there anyone on the list serve with relationship to
Pa. State who could describe their program.

Thanks and happy holidays to all,

Ellen Kirby



-----Original Message-----
From: community_garden-admin@mallorn.com
[mailto:community_garden-admin@mallorn.com] 
Sent: Wednesday, December 17, 2003 1:00 PM
To: community_garden@mallorn.com
Subject: community_garden digest, Vol 1 #1624 - 2 msgs



Send community_garden mailing list submissions to
	community_garden@mallorn.com

To subscribe or unsubscribe via the web, visit
	https://secure.mallorn.com/mailman/listinfo/community_garden
or, via email, send a message with subject or body 'help' to
	community_garden-request@mallorn.com
You can reach the person managing the list at
	community_garden-admin@mallorn.com

When replying, please edit your Subject line so it is more specific than
"Re: Contents of community_garden digest..."


Today's Topics:

  1. innercity gardening training (grow19@aol.com)
  2. offering tilling as part of community garden services
(cdcg@juno.com)

-- __--__-- 

Message: 1
From: Grow19@aol.com
Date: Wed, 17 Dec 2003 11:09:25 EST
To: community_garden@mallorn.com
Subject: [cg] innercity gardening training


--part1_51.38c64360.2d11d9b5_boundary
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="US-ASCII"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

I'm looking for models of gardening training designed for urban
innercity 
settings, especially for low-income low literacy learners, covering
organic 
edible gardening as well as composting and basic ornamental garden
design.  I'm 
wondering if there are any urban master gardening programs designed this
way or 
other similar education series.  Feel free to email back to the list
serve or 
directly to me at grow19@aol.com

Judy Tiger
Garden Resources of Washington
Washington, DC

--part1_51.38c64360.2d11d9b5_boundary
Content-Type: text/html; charset="US-ASCII"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

<HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT  SIZE=3D2 PTSIZE=3D10
FAMILY=3D"SER= IF" FACE=3D"Times New Roman" LANG=3D"0">I'm looking for
models of gardening=20= training designed for urban innercity settings,
especially for low-income lo= w literacy learners, covering organic
edible gardening as well as composting=  and basic ornamental garden
design. &nbsp;I'm wondering if there are any ur= ban master gardening
programs designed this way or other similar education s= eries.
&nbsp;Feel free to email back to the list serve or directly to me at=20=
grow19@aol.com <BR> <BR>Judy Tiger <BR>Garden Resources of Washington
<BR>Washington, DC</FONT></HTML>

--part1_51.38c64360.2d11d9b5_boundary--


-- __--__-- 

Message: 2
Date: Wed, 17 Dec 2003 16:44:18 GMT
To: community_garden@mallorn.com
From: cdcg@juno.com
Subject: [cg] offering tilling as part of community garden services


Hi all, 
I manage a large (39 gardens/600 gardeners) community gardening program
in upstate New York. We have always offered free tilling as part of our
services, and at present charge our gardeners a very low sign-up fee
($10). As we've grown, we have continued to offer tilling at no charge
to our gardeners, though it taxes our small staff considerably and gives
gardeners a reason to inundate us with calls in the spring (why haven't
you tilled my garden yet? when will you till my plot? i haven't had a
good season because you tilled so late....). 

I would like to institute a fee-for service policy as regards tilling
and wonder if a)anyone else has faced this issue and b)if so, what a
fair-market price might be for such a service. 


Thanks in advance for any thoughts you might have on the great tilling
debate. 

Best,
Marci Nelligan
CDCG


________________________________________________________________
The best thing to hit the internet in years - Juno SpeedBand! Surf the
web up to FIVE TIMES FASTER! Only $14.95/ month - visit www.juno.com to
sign up today!




-- __--__-- 

______________________________________________________
The American Community Gardening Association listserve is only one of
ACGA's services to community gardeners. To learn more about the ACGA and
to find out how to join, please go to http://www.communitygarden.org

To post an e-mail to the list:  community_garden@mallorn.com

To subscribe, unsubscribe or change your subscription:
https://secure.mallorn.com/mailman/listinfo/community_garden


End of community_garden Digest


--__--__--

Message: 2
From: Adam36055@aol.com
Date: Wed, 17 Dec 2003 15:26:44 EST
Subject: Re: [cg] offering tilling as part of community garden services
To: cdcg@juno.com
CC: community_garden@mallorn.com


--part1_9.1ebf4e93.2d121604_boundary
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="US-ASCII"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Marci, 

We garden south of you in NYC's Clinton Community Garden (web link:
Clinton 
Community Garden ) and the idea of a gardening coordinating group like
yours 
coming in and tilling garden plots that should have been lovingly
composted and 
amended by the community gardeners themselves seems quite alien.
However, in 
some areas out of NYC, it is done as a service to gardeners, but like 
anything else, should be contingent on funding and manpower
considerations. 

Quite frankly, the more that individual community gardens and gardeners
do 
for themselves in the actual running and bull work in their gardens,
including 
to learning how to do fundraising and neighborhood advocacy for their
gardens, 
the better off they will be in the long run. 

Please  realize that my comments come from the common NYC experience of 
having to clear a rubble, rusted car and garbage strewn abandoned urban
lot with my 
mates, and while eternally grateful for the support work that Trust for 
Public Land, Green Guerillas, Green Thumb and the NYC Parks Dept gave
the Clinton 
Community Garden in our early years  order to help us survive and  get 
organized as a 501(c)(3) corporation,  there comes a point when the
doctor has to slap 
the baby on the rear end, have it take a big deep breath and learn to be
self 
reliant. 

You need to be frank with your gardeners about what your limited
resources 
are, how few of you there are and what can realistically be done. Expect

whining, and not a few to use it as an excuse not to garden - -

That's OK.  The gardeners who learn to do for themselves ( with the
exception 
of kids, the disabled or seniors who really need the hand) will be far
better 
off in the long run. 

Best wishes,
Adam Honigman,
Volunteer, 
 Clinton Community Garden 

  

For the history of how we did it, here's our link -   Clinton Community 
Garden  

--part1_9.1ebf4e93.2d121604_boundary
Content-Type: text/html; charset="US-ASCII"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

<HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><HTML><BODY BGCOLOR=3D"#ffffff"><FONT
BA=
CK=3D"#ffffff" style=3D"BACKGROUND-COLOR: #ffffff" SIZE=3D2 PTSIZE=3D10
FAMI=
LY=3D"SANSSERIF" FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0">Marci, <BR>
<BR>
We garden south of you in NYC's Clinton Community Garden (web
link:&nbsp; <A=
 HREF=3D"http://www.clintoncommunitygarden.org/";>Clinton Community
Garden</A=
> ) and the idea of a gardening coordinating group like yours coming in
and=20=
tilling garden plots that should have been lovingly composted and
amended by=
 the community gardeners themselves seems quite alien.&nbsp; However, in
som=
e areas out of NYC, it is done as a service to gardeners, but like
anything=20=
else, should be contingent on funding and manpower considerations. <BR>
<BR>
Quite frankly, the more that individual community gardens and gardeners
do f=
or themselves in the actual running and bull work in their gardens,
includin=
g to learning how to do fundraising and neighborhood advocacy for their
gard=
ens, the better off they will be in the long run. <BR>
<BR>
Please&nbsp; realize that my comments come from the common NYC
experience of=
 having to clear a rubble, rusted car and garbage strewn abandoned urban
lot=
 with my mates, and while eternally grateful for the support work that
Trust=
 for Public Land, Green Guerillas, Green Thumb and the NYC Parks Dept
gave t=
he Clinton Community Garden in our early years&nbsp; order to help us
surviv=
e and&nbsp; get organized as a 501(c)(3) corporation,&nbsp; there comes
a po=
int when the doctor has to slap the baby on the rear end, have it take a
big=
 deep breath and learn to be self reliant. <BR>
<BR>
You need to be frank with your gardeners about what your limited
resources a=
re, how few of you there are and what can realistically be done. Expect
whin=
ing, and not a few to use it as an excuse not to garden - -<BR>
<BR>
That's OK.&nbsp; The gardeners who learn to do for themselves ( with the
exc=
eption of kids, the disabled or seniors who really need the hand) will
be fa=
r better off in the long run. <BR>
<BR>
Best wishes,<BR>
Adam Honigman,<BR>
Volunteer, <BR>
 <A HREF=3D"http://www.clintoncommunitygarden.org/";>Clinton Community
Garden=
</A> <BR>
<BR>
&nbsp; <BR>
<BR>
For the history of how we did it, here's our link -&nbsp;&nbsp; <A
HREF=3D"h=
ttp://www.clintoncommunitygarden.org/">Clinton Community
Garden</A>&nbsp; </=
FONT></HTML>

--part1_9.1ebf4e93.2d121604_boundary--


--__--__--

Message: 3
From: "Tom Dietrich" <tdietrich@metroparks.org>
To: <community_garden@mallorn.com>
Date: Wed, 17 Dec 2003 16:54:03 -0500
charset="iso-8859-1"
Subject: [cg] RE: offering tilling as part of community garden services

Marci:

This is a difficulty for our small program as well (24 gardens and 2
full
time staff).  We have discussed it with gardeners and they feel that the
tilling is one of the most valuable services that we offer to
established
gardens.  So despite all the gripes and "when are you going to..."
calls,
they are generally happy for the service.  We do limit each garden to
one
tilling in spring and a fall plow down.

My question to you is are you trying to offset cost of staff time or to
encourage more independence?  I have a feeling that if you actually
charged
the cost of your staff time, it would be more than gardeners want to pay
(?).  I know some cg programs do hire out the service though.  Maybe
they
will reply too.

Good luck.

Tom Dietrich
Grow With Your Neighbors
Dayton, OH

Message: 2
Date: Wed, 17 Dec 2003 16:44:18 GMT
To: community_garden@mallorn.com
From: cdcg@juno.com
Subject: [cg] offering tilling as part of community garden services


Hi all,
I manage a large (39 gardens/600 gardeners) community gardening program
in
upstate New York. We have always offered free tilling as part of our
services, and at present charge our gardeners a very low sign-up fee
($10).
As we've grown, we have continued to offer tilling at no charge to our
gardeners, though it taxes our small staff considerably and gives
gardeners
a reason to inundate us with calls in the spring (why haven't you tilled
my
garden yet? when will you till my plot? i haven't had a good season
because
you tilled so late....).

I would like to institute a fee-for service policy as regards tilling
and
wonder if a)anyone else has faced this issue and b)if so, what a
fair-market
price might be for such a service.


Thanks in advance for any thoughts you might have on the great tilling
debate.

Best,
Marci Nelligan
CDCG







-- __--__-- 

______________________________________________________
The American Community Gardening Association listserve is only one of
ACGA's
services to community gardeners. To learn more about the ACGA and to
find
out how to join, please go to http://www.communitygarden.org

To post an e-mail to the list:  community_garden@mallorn.com

To subscribe, unsubscribe or change your subscription:
https://secure.mallorn.com/mailman/listinfo/community_garden


End of community_garden Digest


--__--__--

Message: 4
Reply-To: <udistrict@sygw.org>
From: "Karina Luboff" <kluboff@churchcouncilseattle.org>
To: <community_garden@mallorn.com>
Subject: RE: [cg] RE: community_garden digest, Vol 1 #1624 - 2 msgs
Date: Wed, 17 Dec 2003 11:32:32 -0800
charset="iso-8859-1"

The Food Project in Boston has a manual and a whole program based on
very
similar youth.  www.thefoodproject.org.  We work with immigrant,
low-income
and homeless youth but have a less well defined program.  Also see the
Rooted in Community conference info at www.lejyouth.org/events.

Karina Luboff
University District Project Manager
Seattle Youth Garden Works
206 525-1213 x3134


-----Original Message-----
From: community_garden-admin@mallorn.com
[mailto:community_garden-admin@mallorn.com]On Behalf Of Kirby, Ellen
Sent: Wednesday, December 17, 2003 10:16 AM
To: community_garden@mallorn.com
Subject: [cg] RE: community_garden digest, Vol 1 #1624 - 2 msgs


I'm also very interested in this question.  I think Pa.State has a
program including training manual. It would be great to know of other
such programs. Is there anyone on the list serve with relationship to
Pa. State who could describe their program.

Thanks and happy holidays to all,

Ellen Kirby



-----Original Message-----
From: community_garden-admin@mallorn.com
[mailto:community_garden-admin@mallorn.com]
Sent: Wednesday, December 17, 2003 1:00 PM
To: community_garden@mallorn.com
Subject: community_garden digest, Vol 1 #1624 - 2 msgs



Send community_garden mailing list submissions to
	community_garden@mallorn.com

To subscribe or unsubscribe via the web, visit
	https://secure.mallorn.com/mailman/listinfo/community_garden
or, via email, send a message with subject or body 'help' to
	community_garden-request@mallorn.com
You can reach the person managing the list at
	community_garden-admin@mallorn.com

When replying, please edit your Subject line so it is more specific than
"Re: Contents of community_garden digest..."


Today's Topics:

  1. innercity gardening training (grow19@aol.com)
  2. offering tilling as part of community garden services
(cdcg@juno.com)

-- __--__-- 

Message: 1
From: Grow19@aol.com
Date: Wed, 17 Dec 2003 11:09:25 EST
To: community_garden@mallorn.com
Subject: [cg] innercity gardening training


--part1_51.38c64360.2d11d9b5_boundary
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="US-ASCII"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

I'm looking for models of gardening training designed for urban
innercity
settings, especially for low-income low literacy learners, covering
organic
edible gardening as well as composting and basic ornamental garden
design.  I'm
wondering if there are any urban master gardening programs designed this
way or
other similar education series.  Feel free to email back to the list
serve or
directly to me at grow19@aol.com

Judy Tiger
Garden Resources of Washington
Washington, DC

--part1_51.38c64360.2d11d9b5_boundary
Content-Type: text/html; charset="US-ASCII"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

<HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT  SIZE=3D2 PTSIZE=3D10
FAMILY=3D"SER= IF" FACE=3D"Times New Roman" LANG=3D"0">I'm looking for
models of gardening=20= training designed for urban innercity settings,
especially for low-income lo= w literacy learners, covering organic
edible gardening as well as composting=  and basic ornamental garden
design. &nbsp;I'm wondering if there are any ur= ban master gardening
programs designed this way or other similar education s= eries.
&nbsp;Feel free to email back to the list serve or directly to me at=20=
grow19@aol.com <BR> <BR>Judy Tiger <BR>Garden Resources of Washington
<BR>Washington, DC</FONT></HTML>

--part1_51.38c64360.2d11d9b5_boundary--


-- __--__-- 

Message: 2
Date: Wed, 17 Dec 2003 16:44:18 GMT
To: community_garden@mallorn.com
From: cdcg@juno.com
Subject: [cg] offering tilling as part of community garden services


Hi all,
I manage a large (39 gardens/600 gardeners) community gardening program
in upstate New York. We have always offered free tilling as part of our
services, and at present charge our gardeners a very low sign-up fee
($10). As we've grown, we have continued to offer tilling at no charge
to our gardeners, though it taxes our small staff considerably and gives
gardeners a reason to inundate us with calls in the spring (why haven't
you tilled my garden yet? when will you till my plot? i haven't had a
good season because you tilled so late....).

I would like to institute a fee-for service policy as regards tilling
and wonder if a)anyone else has faced this issue and b)if so, what a
fair-market price might be for such a service.


Thanks in advance for any thoughts you might have on the great tilling
debate.

Best,
Marci Nelligan
CDCG


________________________________________________________________
The best thing to hit the internet in years - Juno SpeedBand! Surf the
web up to FIVE TIMES FASTER! Only $14.95/ month - visit www.juno.com to
sign up today!




-- __--__-- 

______________________________________________________
The American Community Gardening Association listserve is only one of
ACGA's services to community gardeners. To learn more about the ACGA and
to find out how to join, please go to http://www.communitygarden.org

To post an e-mail to the list:  community_garden@mallorn.com

To subscribe, unsubscribe or change your subscription:
https://secure.mallorn.com/mailman/listinfo/community_garden


End of community_garden Digest


______________________________________________________
The American Community Gardening Association listserve is only one of
ACGA's
services to community gardeners. To learn more about the ACGA and to
find
out how to join, please go to http://www.communitygarden.org


To post an e-mail to the list:  community_garden@mallorn.com

To subscribe, unsubscribe or change your subscription:
https://secure.mallorn.com/mailman/listinfo/community_garden



--__--__--

Message: 5
Date: Wed, 17 Dec 2003 19:16:10 -0500
To: <community_garden@mallorn.com>
From: Alliums <garlicgrower@earthlink.net>
<000e01c3c4e8$49b6a830$0803000a@metroparks.org>
Subject: [cg] Re: offering tilling as part of community garden services

Hi, Folks!

We till each spring because with 40+ years of weed seeds in the ground,
the 
garden would be unmanageable without it.  We hire a professional who
comes 
in with his industrial-size rototiller and does the job in under an 
hour.  The funds come from a local grant.

The garden is not tilled until I say the ground is ready -- this can be 
anywhere from the 2nd week of March until the last week of April,
depending 
on that spring's rain (adds days) and wind (removes days) and if folks
miss 
early crops for that year, I hear about it.  However, it's also an 
opportunity to educate people about soil structure (plow too early and
the 
soil structure is destroyed for the year) and the fact that they can
plant 
traditional early spring plants again in the late summer/early fall --
so 
one's peas may only be delayed, rather than eliminated for that year.

We now have composters in each plot to encourage in-season composting
and 
encourage sheet composting through the fall and winter so that the 
rototiller in the spring can turn everything under and improve the 
soil.  Those who compost have a lot better soil than those who don't,
but 
if we left the plots as-is, the foxtail, barnyard grass, lambquarters
and 
ragweed would take over.  Some people learn and some don't care (and
leave 
the garden), so if your plots are of a decent size (ours are 25 foot
square 
and larger), it's better to till once a year than have an unsightly weed

problem for the neighbors to complain about you for.

Dorene Pasekoff, Coordinator
St. John's United Church of Christ Organic Community Garden

A mission of
St. John's United Church of Christ, 315 Gay Street, Phoenixville, PA
19460


--__--__--

Message: 6
From: Grow19@aol.com
Date: Wed, 17 Dec 2003 19:49:00 EST
Subject: Re: [cg] Re: offering tilling as part of community garden
services
To: community_garden@mallorn.com


--part1_bd.3a704fa6.2d12537c_boundary
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="US-ASCII"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

I'm interested in the fact that no one has mentioned building in the
cost of 
tilling into the garden plot dues.  And in areas that don't already have
major 
presence of weed seeds, is there any attempt to build up the organic
matter 
in the soil, use cover crops and turn the soil by hand?

Judy Tiger
Washington, DC

--part1_bd.3a704fa6.2d12537c_boundary
Content-Type: text/html; charset="US-ASCII"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

<HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT  SIZE=3D2 PTSIZE=3D10
FAMILY=3D"SER=
IF" FACE=3D"Times New Roman" LANG=3D"0">I'm interested in the fact that
no o=
ne has mentioned building in the cost of tilling into the garden plot
dues.=20=
&nbsp;And in areas that don't already have major presence of weed seeds,
is=20=
there any attempt to build up the organic matter in the soil, use cover
crop=
s and turn the soil by hand?
<BR>
<BR>Judy Tiger
<BR>Washington, DC</FONT></HTML>

--part1_bd.3a704fa6.2d12537c_boundary--


--__--__--

Message: 7
<000e01c3c4e8$49b6a830$0803000a@metroparks.org>
<6.0.0.22.2.20031217190546.01c50b78@pop.earthlink.net>
Date: Wed, 17 Dec 2003 20:16:34 -0500
To: Alliums <garlicgrower@earthlink.net>
From: "Libby J. Goldstein" <libby@igc.org>
Subject: [cg] Re: offering tilling as part of community garden services
Cc: community_garden@mallorn.com

--============_-1140412298==_ma============
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii" ; format="flowed"

Our garden has been going since 1976, and the only time we till (or 
threaten to) is in August if a garden has been abandoned or allowed 
to go to weeds. After tilling the garden is turned over to another 
gardener for fall crops.

We've generally found that hand tillage is sufficient unto the day, 
and many of us do no-till entirely.

In the beginning we had to use picks to turn the soil, but after all 
these years of adding organic matter, I just use a trowel when 
transplanting. Otherwise, I add amendments on top of the soil and let 
the worms and other beasts do my work for me.

Happy Holidays,

Libby
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<html><head><style type="text/css"><!--
blockquote, dl, ul, ol, li { padding-top: 0 ; padding-bottom: 0 }
 --></style><title>[cg] Re: offering tilling as part of community
garden</title></head><body>
<div>Our garden has been going since 1976, and the only time we till
(or threaten to) is in August if a garden has been abandoned or
allowed to go to weeds. After tilling the garden is turned over to
another gardener for fall crops.</div>
<div><br></div>
<div>We've generally found that hand tillage is sufficient unto the
day, and many of us do no-till entirely.</div>
<div><br></div>
<div>In the beginning we had to use picks to turn the soil, but after
all these years of adding organic matter, I just use a trowel when
transplanting. Otherwise, I add amendments on top of the soil and let
the worms and other beasts do my work for me.</div>
<div><br></div>
<div><font color="#FF0000">Happy</font><font color="#007700">
Holidays,</font></div>
<div><font color="#007700"><br></font></div>
<div>Libby</div>
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The American Community Gardening Association listserve is only one of ACGA's services to community gardeners. To learn more about the ACGA and to find out how to join, please go to http://www.communitygarden.org


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