hort.net Seasonal photo, (c) 2006 Christopher P. Lindsey, All Rights Reserved: do not copy
articles | gallery of plants | blog | tech blog | plant profiles | patents | mailing lists | top stories | links | shorturl service | tom clothier's archive0
 Navigation
Articles
Gallery of Plants
Blog
Tech Blog
Plant Profiles
Patents
Mailing Lists
    FAQ
    Netiquette
    Search ALL lists
    Search help
    Subscription info
Top Stories
Links
sHORTurl service
Tom Clothier's Archive
 Top Stories
Disease could hit Britain's trees hard

Ten of the best snowdrop cultivars

Plant protein database helps identify plant gene functions

Dendroclimatologists record history through trees

Potato beetle could be thwarted through gene manipulation

Hawaii expands coffee farm quarantine

Study explains flower petal loss

Unauthorized use of a plant doesn't invalidate it's patent

RSS story archive

Re: Urea


RE:Adam's request for  a solution to putting urea on rocks without an 
infraction of NYC laws and health codes in order to promote moss  growth.   
Many fertilizers have urea as the component of their nitrogen content.   If 
urea on a rock will promote moss growth, then  I would presume that painting 
the rock with some fertilizer would be a good place to start experimentally.  
 Different strengths of a particular fertilizer would probably have different 
effects.   You can buy active moss spores from a BONSAI store or supply 
source and they even have some sticky material that can be obtained as a 
gluey material that they put on rocks for tree roots(I forget the name of 
it).   To start moss in a new place, deeper shade would be preferable.  
Bonsai people have a lot of experience with mosses.  Try consulting with a 
local group for further info.  Also, a painted on coating or slurry of 
clay(thin) would be another experimental technique that I would try.   Lots 
of area for study and experimentation here.   pH, strength of solution, light 
intensity, chemical composition of the substrate, microbial content etc. are 
all parameters which need to be considered.

Elmer L. Morehouse   - Biologist and Advanced Master Gardener

_______________________________________________
community_garden maillist  -  community_garden@mallorn.com
https://secure.mallorn.com/mailman/listinfo/community_garden





 © 1995-2015 Mallorn Computing, Inc.All Rights Reserved.
Our Privacy Statement
Other Mailing lists | Author Index | Date Index | Subject Index | Thread Index