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Re: If you have weeds...

  • Subject: [cg] Re: If you have weeds...
  • From: Don Boekelheide dboekelheide@yahoo.com
  • Date: Thu, 9 Jun 2005 10:26:19 -0700 (PDT)

>   5. compost (minifarms@aol.com)

> If you have weeds, you are not gardening right.

 > Ken Hargesheimer

Well, dang! I must not be gardening right! But I sure
do enjoy it anyhow.

Here's an nteresting link, for the eco-gardeners
amongst us, and highly recommended reading, Ken:
http://journeytoforever.org/farm_library/weeds/WeedsToC.html

Can't talk compost, have to work on magazine. But, you
can put your stuff in the ground, Judy, if it doesn't
attract critters (you're urban, right? I remember when
Adam told me about the NYC rats that chew through
metal...). But that's not a compost pile - a compost
pile, done right, is like an intensive farm for
beneficial livestock (microbes, fungi...). You feed
the critters under ideal conditions, then add that
living biomass to your soil. We've just got to stop
thinking 'NPK/C Hopkins Cafe' when we add organic
materials to soil. Think soil ecosystem/soil food web.


These days, I also do more mulching than composting
using plant wastes from the garden and elsewhere, but
use worms for kitchen scraps and food stuff from the
garden (like the oozy remains of cool season stuff,
which I better get out of the beds). See everybody in
Minneapolis, where I'd love to talk compost.

Cheers,

Don B, Charlotte NC

> 
> --__--__--
> 
> Message: 1
> Date: Wed, 8 Jun 2005 12:25:26 -0500
> From: "Kirsten Saylor" <ksaylor@greeninstitute.org>
> To: <community_garden@mallorn.com>
> Subject: [cg] Twin Cities Community Garden Listserv
> -update
> 
> Thanks Diane for promoting the listserv -- I am my
> own worst promoter...
> But I need to clarify how one should subscribe to
> the listserv.
> 
> Two options:
> One way is to email listserv@lists.umn.edu, and in
> the body of the email
> type "subscribe comgar-l".  No need to put anything
> in the subject line,
> only "subscribe comgar-l"
> 
> The other way is to email to the manager:
> comgartc@hotmail.com -- need
> your name and email address, that's it.
> 
> This listserv is the result of a collaboration with
> the University of
> Minnesota Extension.  We are happy to have their
> support.
> 
> The listserv is a forum for gardeners and garden
> supporters to share
> advice, expertise and experience, whether it is a
> question about
> gardening techniques, getting resources, building
> garden community,
> garnering financial support and garden sponsors,
> securing land or
> looking for insurance.  Basically it's a place/space
> for gardeners
> throughout the metro area to assist other gardeners
> and keep everyone
> updated on current events.
> 
> 
> Kirsten Saylor
> GreenSpace Partners
> Green Institute
> 2801 21st. Ave. S., Ste 110
> Minneapolis, MN  55407
> ksaylor@greeninstitute.org
> 612.278.7123
> 
> 
> --__--__--
> 
> Message: 2
> From: Grow19@aol.com
> Date: Wed, 8 Jun 2005 13:28:45 EDT
> To: community_garden@mallorn.com
> Subject: [cg] a bit of "composting" advice please
> 
> Can I dig some food scraps directly into the ground
> around plants in my  
> vegetable garden, such as egg shells, coffee
> grounds, etc?  Or is it a must  to 
> use a compost pile.  Not to sound too lazy, but I'm
> wondering which  things 
> could be dug in and which really should be put into
> a compost pile.   In this 
> season, I mostly have egg shells and coffee, a few
> ends of fresh greens,  but most 
> of the fresh produce I use generates little waste.  
>  
> Judy Tiger, WashDC
> 
> 
> --__--__--
> 
> Message: 3
> From: "Deborah Mills" <deborah@greencure.org>
> To: <Grow19@aol.com>, <community_garden@mallorn.com>
> Subject: Re: [cg] a bit of "composting" advice
> please
> Date: Wed, 8 Jun 2005 11:31:16 -0700
> 
> The best thing to do Judy is to dig the food scraps
> into the ground in an
> area where you plan to plant in a month or so. To
> put it simply, let the
> decomposition process take place so it doesn't
> compete with plant growth.
> 
> I have placed coffee grounds (no filters) around
> plants and have found that
> it can be beneficial "as is". But if you add the
> filter (carbon) the
> nitrogen shall be "locked up" sort-of-speak with the
> decomposers.
> 
> Hope this helps.
> 
> Deborah
> 
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: <Grow19@aol.com>
> To: <community_garden@mallorn.com>
> Sent: Wednesday, June 08, 2005 10:28 AM
> Subject: [cg] a bit of "composting" advice please
> 
> 
> > Can I dig some food scraps directly into the
> ground around plants in my
> > vegetable garden, such as egg shells, coffee
> grounds, etc?  Or is it a
> must  to
> > use a compost pile.  Not to sound too lazy, but
> I'm wondering which
> things
> > could be dug in and which really should be put
> into a compost pile.   In
> this
> > season, I mostly have egg shells and coffee, a few
> ends of fresh greens,
> but most
> > of the fresh produce I use generates little waste.
> >
> > Judy Tiger, WashDC
> >
> >
> >
>
______________________________________________________
> > The American Community Gardening Association
> listserve is only one of
> ACGA's services to community gardeners. To learn
> more about the ACGA and to
> find out how to join, please go to
> http://www.communitygarden.org
> >
> >
> > To post an e-mail to the list: 
> community_garden@mallorn.com
> >
> > To subscribe, unsubscribe or change your
> subscription:
>
https://secure.mallorn.com/mailman/listinfo/community_garden
> 
> 
> --__--__--
> 
> Message: 4
> Date: Wed, 08 Jun 2005 14:43:27 -0500
> Subject: Re: [cg] a bit of "composting" advice
> please
> From: Lekoma Akate <lekoma216@cox.net>
> To: <Grow19@aol.com>, <community_garden@mallorn.com>
> 
> Judy,  
> 
> We are not experts in the field of compost, though
> we do compost a good bit.
> From experience, there seems to be no real issue
> with digging in coffee
> grounds.  As long as it is not excessive,
> proportionally to the soil.  The
> egg shells will not decompose quickly, so even in
> compost, they can come
> through the process in tact.  They are very slow
> releasing calcium source.
> Just as hair, untreated, is a slow releasing
> nitrogen source.  Nature puts
> 
=== message truncated ===


______________________________________________________
The American Community Gardening Association listserve is only one of ACGA's services to community gardeners. To learn more about the ACGA and to find out how to join, please go to http://www.communitygarden.org


To post an e-mail to the list:  community_garden@mallorn.com

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