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RE: RE: community_garden digest, Vol 1 #994 - 4 msgs

  • Subject: RE: [cg] RE: community_garden digest, Vol 1 #994 - 4 msgs
  • From: "Jim.Call" <jimcall@casagarden.com>
  • Date: Mon, 18 Mar 2002 13:18:30 -0600
  • Importance: Normal

I concur with Julie on this.  We use composted leaf mulch in our Alabama
clayey soil.  You need something to break the soil up and provide aeration
(plus you are adding valuable nutrients).  Try to use the most composted
leaf mulch as possible otherwise you will tie up your nitrogen.

Jim

> -----Original Message-----
> From: community_garden-admin@mallorn.com
> [mailto:community_garden-admin@mallorn.com]On Behalf Of Julie Berbiglia
> Sent: Monday, March 18, 2002 12:39 PM
> To: community_garden@mallorn.com
> Subject: [cg] RE: community_garden digest, Vol 1 #994 - 4 msgs
>
>
> RE: Adding sand to clay soil:
>
> I would like to caution against adding sand to clay soil. Here in Middle
> Tenness our clay is very thick and adding sand to it only makes it the
> consistency of concrete! Lots of rotten leaves and compost is a better
> solution for heavy clay soils.
>
> Julie Berbiglia
> Organic Garden Coordinator
> Scarritt-Bennett Center
> 1008 19th Avenue South
> Nashville, TN  37212-2166
> 615/340-7471
> garden@scarrittbennett.org
> www.scarrittbennett.org
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: community_garden-admin@mallorn.com
> [mailto:community_garden-admin@mallorn.com]
> Sent: Sunday, March 17, 2002 12:00 PM
> To: community_garden@mallorn.com
> Subject: community_garden digest, Vol 1 #994 - 4 msgs
>
>
>
> Send community_garden mailing list submissions to
> 	community_garden@mallorn.com
>
> To subscribe or unsubscribe via the web, visit
> 	https://secure.mallorn.com/mailman/listinfo/community_garden
> or, via email, send a message with subject or body 'help' to
> 	community_garden-request@mallorn.com
> You can reach the person managing the list at
> 	community_garden-admin@mallorn.com
>
> When replying, please edit your Subject line so it is more specific than
> "Re: Contents of community_garden digest..."
>
>
> Today's Topics:
>
>   1. Re: raised beds on wet soil (steveshome@juno.com)
>   2. Re: wet soil (lisa vandyke)
>   3. wet ground techniques (plenneke)
>   4. Re: wet soil (plenneke)
>
> --__--__--
>
> Message: 1
> To: community_garden@mallorn.com
> Date: Sat, 16 Mar 2002 13:16:48 -0800
> Subject: Re: [cg] raised beds on wet soil
> From: steveshome@juno.com
>
> This message is in MIME format.  Since your mail reader does not
> understand
> this format, some or all of this message may not be legible.
>
> ----__JNP_000_00e0.2e7f.7ec2
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
> Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
>
> Hi Valarie,
>
> You may wish to consider sand in your wet soil if it has a high clay
> content, which is likely. The sand will allow quicker drainage.
>
> Compost is always rightly prescribed for just about any soil problem and
> it will serve you well. Evergreen wood chips are super as a mulch but you
> may be in a location with lots of slugs or snails. These aren't the
> beneficial garden critters you were thinking of, I suspect. They will
> like that mulch to hang out in. Your young tender bean plants and such
> will make a tasty nightly salad for these critters.
>
> Removing a few inches of soil from permanent garden paths and placing it
> on your beds may give you enough elevation to keep the plants from being
> submerged during a rain. Consider making wider paths and narrower beds to
> get the soil level where you need it. Might save some work especially if
> you decide to haul in some sand and compost.
>
> I agree entirely with Don on the subject of the fabric and gravel. They
> are uncalled for.
>
> Yours,
>
> Steve Smoot
> Spokane Farmers' Market Association
>
> Valarie writes:
> Date: Fri, 15 Mar 2002 18:24:05 -0800
>
> I have started working with a teachers at a local middle school who are
> laying plans for a raised bed garden.  The ground on which the beds will
> be
> placed is typically soggy during the rainy season and there's some
> concern
> that the soil in the beds will not drain properly.  Someone has suggested
> that a layer of fabric and then a layer of gravel be placed in the bottom
> of
> the beds before the soil.
>
> My concern is that roots would be too restricted in a 8 to 10 inch layer
> of
> soil as the roots will be unable to reach threw to the ground.  Also, I
> would be concerned that worms and other beneficial critters might not be
> able to reach the soil in the beds with this barrier.
>
> Any comments or suggestions on this?
>
> Thanks.  Valarie
> ----__JNP_000_00e0.2e7f.7ec2
> Content-Type: text/html; charset=us-ascii
> Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable
>
> <!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN">
> <HTML><HEAD>
> <META content=3D"text/html; charset=3Dwindows-1252" http-equiv=3DContent-=
> Type>
> <META content=3D"MSHTML 5.00.2722.2800" name=3DGENERATOR></HEAD>
> <BODY bottomMargin=3D0 leftMargin=3D3 rightMargin=3D3 topMargin=3D0>
> <DIV>Hi Valarie,</DIV>
> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>
> <DIV>You may wish to consider sand in your wet soil if it has a
> high clay=20
> content, which is likely. The sand will allow quicker drainage.</DIV>
> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>
> <DIV>Compost is always rightly prescribed for just about any soil
> problem =
> and it=20
> will serve you well. Evergreen&nbsp;wood chips are super as a
> mulch but you=
>  may=20
> be in a location with lots of slugs or snails. These aren't the&nbsp;=
> beneficial=20
> garden critters you were thinking of, I suspect. They will like
> that mulch=
> =20
> to&nbsp;hang out in.&nbsp;Your young tender bean plants and such
> will make =
> a=20
> tasty nightly salad for these critters.</DIV>
> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>
> <DIV>Removing a few inches of soil from permanent garden paths
> and placing =
> it=20
> on&nbsp;your beds may give you enough elevation to keep the plants from =
> being=20
> submerged during a rain. Consider making&nbsp;wider paths and
> narrower beds=
>  to=20
> get the soil level where you need it. Might save some&nbsp;work
> especially =
> if=20
> you decide to haul in some sand and compost.</DIV>
> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>
> <DIV>I agree entirely with Don on the subject of the fabric and gravel. =
> They are=20
> uncalled for.</DIV>
> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>
> <DIV>Yours,</DIV>
> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>
> <DIV>Steve Smoot</DIV>
> <DIV>Spokane Farmers' Market Association</DIV>
> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>
> <DIV>Valarie writes:</DIV>
> <DIV>Date: Fri, 15 Mar 2002 18:24:05 -0800<BR></DIV>
> <DIV>I have started working with a teachers at a local middle
> school who=20
> are<BR>laying plans for a raised bed garden.&nbsp; The ground on
> which the =
> beds=20
> will be<BR>placed is typically soggy during the rainy season and there's =
> some=20
> concern<BR>that the soil in the beds will not drain
> properly.&nbsp; Someone=
>  has=20
> suggested<BR>that a layer of fabric and then a layer of gravel be
> placed in=
>  the=20
> bottom of<BR>the beds before the soil.&nbsp; </DIV>
> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>
> <DIV>My concern is that roots would be too restricted in a 8 to 10 inch =
> layer=20
> of<BR>soil as the roots will be unable to reach threw to the
> ground.&nbsp; =
> Also,=20
> I<BR>would be concerned that worms and other beneficial critters
> might not=
> =20
> be<BR>able to reach the soil in the beds with this barrier.&nbsp; </DIV>
> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>
> <DIV>Any comments or suggestions on this?</DIV>
> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>
> <DIV>Thanks.&nbsp; Valarie</DIV></BODY></HTML>
>
> ----__JNP_000_00e0.2e7f.7ec2--
>
>
> --__--__--
>
> Message: 2
> From: "lisa vandyke" <vandykelisa@hotmail.com>
> To: community_garden@mallorn.com
> Date: Sat, 16 Mar 2002 16:00:52 -0600
> Subject: [cg] Re: wet soil
>
>
> Hi there,
> I agree with Don to not layer substrates, this causes a perched
> water table.
> Raise the depth of the beds, making certain that they aren't on
> the low end
> of the land, and mix in plenty of well composted organic matter, esp. (if
> you can get it) composted tree bark. The larger the particle size, the
> better the drainage, but don't tie up the nitrogen with uncomposted
> material. The more clay you have in your soil, the more organic matter you
> add... Good luck!
> Lisa in Mpls.
>
> >
>
> _________________________________________________________________
> MSN Photos is the easiest way to share and print your photos:
> http://photos.msn.com/support/worldwide.aspx
>
>
> --__--__--
>
> Message: 3
> Date: Sun, 17 Mar 2002 10:49:24 +1200
> To: community_garden@mallorn.com
> From: plenneke <plenneke@xtra.co.nz>
> Subject: [cg] wet ground techniques
>
> <html><div>Hi Valerie,</div>
> <div>I would like to put my tuppenyworth advise in as well.</div>
> <div>To get your vegetable patch tro take off, and grow decent size
> vegetables,</div>
> <div>to get lovely flowerplants thriving, Use Wormcastings or vermicast,
> </div>
> <div>this works well when watered in.</div>
> <div>The ideas are all excellent, make your beds as high as is
> comfortable to work at.</div>
> <div>My neighbor has raised beds, they are about half a metre high off
> the groundlevel.</div>
> <div>We have freedraining soil here, it is heavy pumice, quite grainy in
> texture, but it</div>
> <div>has very little foodvalue for the garden, that is why we get good
> results with </div>
> <div>that handful of wormcast around the plants regularly.</div>
> <div>the advantage of wormcastings is, that it is natural, and cannot
> &quot;burn&quot;</div>
> <div>Good luck, your spring is just aropund teh corner now, we are having
> a lovely</div>
> <div>autumn here in New Zealand.</div>
> <div>I breed worms and have wormcast available (fresh), packed in
> resealable bags</div>
> if you want it, I will export by airmail at cost.
> <BR>
>
> --Sincerely Yours :<br>
> Hans H.Harmsen,<br>
> E-Mail : <font color="#0000FF">plenneke@xtra.co.nz<br>
> </font><font color="#000000">Website :
> </font><font color="#0000FF">http://www.gronouwe.co.nz<br>
> </font></html>
>
>
> --__--__--
>
> Message: 4
> Date: Sun, 17 Mar 2002 10:52:19 +1200
> To: community_garden@mallorn.com
> From: plenneke <plenneke@xtra.co.nz>
> Subject: [cg] Re: wet soil
> Cc: plenneke@xtra.co.nz
>
> <html><div>Hi Valerie,</div>
> <div>I would like to put my tuppenyworth advise in as well.</div>
> <div>To get your vegetable patch tro take off, and grow decent size
> vegetables,</div>
> <div>to get lovely flowerplants thriving, Use Wormcastings or vermicast,
> </div>
> <div>this works well when watered in.</div>
> <div>The ideas are all excellent, make your beds as high as is
> comfortable to work at.</div>
> <div>My neighbor has raised beds, they are about half a metre high off
> the groundlevel.</div>
> <div>We have freedraining soil here, it is heavy pumice, quite grainy in
> texture, but it</div>
> <div>has very little foodvalue for the garden, that is why we get good
> results with </div>
> <div>that handful of wormcast around the plants regularly.</div>
> <div>the advantage of wormcastings is, that it is natural, and cannot
> &quot;burn&quot;</div>
> <div>Good luck, your spring is just aropund teh corner now, we are having
> a lovely</div>
> <div>autumn here in New Zealand.</div>
> <div>I breed worms and have wormcast available (fresh), packed in
> resealable bags</div>
> if you want it, I will export by airmail at cost.
> <BR>
>
> --Sincerely Yours :<br>
> Hans H.Harmsen,<br>
> E-Mail : <font color="#0000FF">plenneke@xtra.co.nz<br>
> </font><font color="#000000">Website :
> </font><font color="#0000FF">http://www.gronouwe.co.nz<br>
> </font></html>
>
>
>
>
> --__--__--
>
> ______________________________________________________
> The American Community Gardening Association listserve is only
> one of ACGA's
> services to community gardeners. To learn more about the ACGA and to find
> out how to join, please go to http://www.communitygarden.org
>
> To post an e-mail to the list:  community_garden@mallorn.com
>
> To subscribe, unsubscribe or change your subscription:
> https://secure.mallorn.com/mailman/listinfo/community_garden
>
>
> End of community_garden Digest
>
>
>
>
> ______________________________________________________
> The American Community Gardening Association listserve is only
> one of ACGA's services to community gardeners. To learn more
> about the ACGA and to find out how to join, please go to
http://www.communitygarden.org


To post an e-mail to the list:  community_garden@mallorn.com

To subscribe, unsubscribe or change your subscription:
https://secure.mallorn.com/mailman/listinfo/community_garden


______________________________________________________
The American Community Gardening Association listserve is only one of ACGA's services to community gardeners. To learn more about the ACGA and to find out how to join, please go to http://www.communitygarden.org


To post an e-mail to the list:  community_garden@mallorn.com

To subscribe, unsubscribe or change your subscription:  https://secure.mallorn.com/mailman/listinfo/community_garden





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