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Re: Community Garden as part of revamping community's health

  • Subject: Re: [cg] Community Garden as part of revamping community's health
  • From: Charli cholligal@yahoo.com
  • Date: Tue, 7 Mar 2006 12:59:06 -0800 (PST)

How nice and coincidental, I was just about to ask you
folks if anyone out there had experience in community
gardens in very small rural towns. I live in town in
southeastern Tennessee that is the seat of, and only
town in, a county of about 10,000. I just moved here
and haven't been around yet during a growing season,
but I haven't seen much evidence that home veggie
growing activity takes place, at least not in the town
itself. Flowers, yes, veggies, not so much. Certainly
nothing organic. There's no farmers' market nearby,
either. 

I can see all kinds of benefits from a CG for a place
like this: it would claim some of the empty, weedy,
trashy space (of which there are many!), raise the
rather dismal level of awareness of environmental and
health issues (we seem to have a high rate of cancer,
obesity, and heart diesease here, too), provide better
access to fresh veggies, and be a social resource for
neighbors with limiting factors to low-income
residents, like advanced age or a disability...among
other benefits. 

But people here have their own large. Families are
large and ties are strong, as are church-based social
networks. Awareness is something you don't know you
need more of until get a little bit of it to start
with. I know from experience that most people don't
automatically associate the opportunity to garden with
a higher standard of living. 

So what brings people to a CG in a small town? Do any
of you have experience to share? Is it enjoyment?
Company? Better access to healthy food? Concern for
neighborhood appearance? Is there a philanthropical
side to it (giving crops away to residents in need,
etc.)? Does affiliaton with a church or school help
bring people in? I'm not asking for a list of reasons
why CGs are great (I've got lots of those!!), but
rather what you all might have observed as being the
primary motivations for residents in this particular
type of situation. Any insights or stories or pointers
in direction of research already done on the subject
would be most appreciated!!

Cheers,
Charli

> Message: 2
> From: "Sharon Gordon" <gordonse@one.net>
> To: <community_garden@mallorn.com>
> Date: Tue, 7 Mar 2006 07:58:11 -0500
> Subject: [cg] Community Garden as part of revamping
> community's health
> 
> STORY LEAD:
> Pilot Program Fosters Fitness in Three Delta
> Communities
> ___________________________________________
> 
> ARS News Service
> Agricultural Research Service, USDA
> Jim Core, (301) 504-1619, jcore@ars.usda.gov
> March 7, 2006
> --View this report online, plus any included photos
> or other images, at
> www.ars.usda.gov/is/pr
> ___________________________________________
> 
> To improve the nutrition and health of residents in
> three rural communities
> in the South, the Agricultural Research Service
> (ARS) is partnering in a
> pilot program with six universities, state
> cooperative extension services
> and other organizations.
> 
> Obesity, heart disease, stroke and cancer
> disproportionately affect people
> living in Mississippi Delta states. Researchers
> working on the Lower
> Mississippi Delta Nutrition Intervention Research
> Initiative (NIRI) in
> Little Rock, Ark., are studying the population's
> dietary habits, which are
> generally less healthy than the national average.
> 
> As locations for the intervention pilot program,
> NIRI partners selected
> Marvell, Ark., and its surrounding public school
> district; Franklin Parish
> in Louisiana; and the city of Hollandale, Miss. The
> community-based
> participatory research model is being used as the
> framework for carrying out
> the Delta NIRI mission, according to Beverly
> McCabe-Sellers, a nutrition
> scientist and NIRI's research coordinator.
> 
> In Marvell, NIRI initiated a walking club so
> residents can offer each other
> support. Health professionals are invited to give
> participants health,
> nutrition and physical fitness advice. The city also
> received a grant to
> create a farmers' market. Last summer, three
> community gardens were started
> there to provide residents nutritious fruit and
> vegetables.
> 
> In Franklin Parish, local NIRI coordinators are
> expanding a weekly truck
> delivery, or "rolling store," of fresh produce and
> are distributing healthy
> recipes to participants. They hope to join forces
> with a local grocery store
> to stock fresh produce for residents holding special
> vouchers.
> 
> In Hollandale, an advanced walking club was formed,
> with community leaders
> certified as instructors. Local coordinators worked
> with NIRI to install a
> walking trail, basketball court and soccer field in
> a city park.
> 
> According to Margaret L. Bogle, a nutritionist and
> Delta NIRI's executive
> director, scientists and communities are analyzing
> the intervention research
> and determining how to expand these programs into
> other Delta communities.
> 
> Read more about the research in the March issue of
> Agricultural Research
> magazine, available online at:
>
http://www.ars.usda.gov/is/AR/archive/mar06/delta0306.htm
> 
> ARS is the U.S. Department of Agriculture's chief
> scientific research
> agency.
> ___________________________________________
> 
> * This is one of the news reports that ARS
> Information distributes to
> subscribers on weekdays.
> * Start, stop or change an e-mail subscription at
> www.ars.usda.gov/is/pr/subscribe.htm
> * NewsService@ars.usda.gov | www.ars.usda.gov/news
> * Phone (301) 504-1638 | fax (301) 504-1486
> 
> 
> 
> 
> --__--__--
> 
>
______________________________________________________
> The American Community Gardening Association
> listserve is only one of ACGA's services to
> community gardeners. To learn more about the ACGA
> and to find out how to join, please go to
> http://www.communitygarden.org
> 
> To post an e-mail to the list: 
> community_garden@mallorn.com
> 
> To subscribe, unsubscribe or change your
> subscription: 
>
https://secure.mallorn.com/mailman/listinfo/community_garden
> 
> 
> End of community_garden Digest
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______________________________________________________
The American Community Gardening Association listserve is only one of ACGA's services to community gardeners. To learn more about the ACGA and to find out how to join, please go to http://www.communitygarden.org


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