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Bismarck, ND: Slow Food, Native Americans and Community Gardens

  • Subject: [cg] Bismarck, ND: Slow Food, Native Americans and Community Gardens
  • From: Adam36055@aol.com
  • Date: Thu, 11 Nov 2004 19:22:43 EST



Subj: Bismarck, ND: Slow Food, Native Americans and Community Gardens
Date: 11/10/04 7:25:09 AM Eastern Standard Time
From: Adam36055
To: community_garden@mallorn.com



In slow motion
By KAREN HERZOG, Bismarck Tribune
Its logo is a snail.

http://www.bismarcktribune.com/articles/2004/11/10/news/life/lif01.txt

It's called the "slow food movement" and it brought 5,000 people to Turin, Italy, in October -- including Aubrey Skye from the Standing Rock Reservation in North Dakota.

The conference delegates -- rabbit farmers, cheese producers, date growers, beekeepers, brewers, cattle farmers, salami makers, fermented milk producers and many more -- drank local wines, ate artisanal breads and fresh local foods and networked in an effort to preserve the world's food diversity and protect authentic, traditional foods and food producers. 

In Turin, Skye found not fast food, but orchards, vineyards, greenhouses and gardens, he said.

Skye, one of about 50 American Indian delegates, attended as the community garden coordinator for the Standing Rock Diabetes Program in Fort Yates. He was part of a presentation called "Creating Models for Sustainable Agriculture."

A Hunkpapa Lakota member, Skye knows that type 2 diabetes is at epidemic proportions among American Indians. Experts blame this crisis among Indian people on the change in diet from traditional natural foods such as buffalo, squash, corn, beans, game and berries, to a diet high in sugar, salt, fat and simple carbohydrates.

The diabetes program has established five community gardens on the reservation. Elementary school children help plant seeds in trays and transplant them to the gardens around Memorial Day.

"That gives them hands-on experience, teaches them about soil that connects us to the earth," he said. Traditional heirloom seed varieties are planted -- "little memory banks that are part of our cultural identity," he said.

With the help of youth and sometimes inmates from the jail, Skye tends the garden during the growing season. Gardening promotes nutrition and exercise as part of a healthy lifestyle, Skye said.

"It's good therapy, to be near the plants," he said. "Food is medicine."

In the fall, a harvest festival is served -- buffalo stew, squash, corn and pumpkin pies, prepared by the Fort Yates High School cafeteria staff.

Trying to reintroduce that connection to the earth is not going to happen overnight, he said. "But we're making an impact. Slow foods are the traditional diet that kept us healthy," he said.

The Turin conference -- called "Terra Madre" or Mother Earth -- included many traditional peoples, he said.

Guest speakers included Prince Charles, of Britain, and, from Minnesota, Winona LaDuke and Sarah Alexander, authors of "Food as Medicine."

The slow food movement started in 1986 in response to the opening of a McDonald's in Rome's Piazza Spagna, and since then has grown to 70,000 members, including 150 U.S. chapters with 12,500 members.

Around the world, slow food adherents are networking for the preservation of sustainable, ethnic, authentic, traditional and artisanal foods and producers against what they call the industrialization of food worldwide.

"The one thing everybody had in common -- trying to survive in the face of the agri-industrial complex," he said. "The small farmer can't compete. So they try to find little niches.

"Things are going to have to change sooner or later. If we continue to contaminate water and air, deplete the soil, we will run out of nonrenewable resources."

(Reach Karen Herzog at 250-8267 or krherzog@ndonline.com.)


--- Begin Message ---
  • Subject: Bismarck, ND: Slow Food, Native Americans and Community Gardens
  • From: Adam36055@aol.com
  • Date: Wed, 10 Nov 2004 07:25:09 EST
  • Full-name: Adam36055
In slow motion
By KAREN HERZOG, Bismarck Tribune
Its logo is a snail.

http://www.bismarcktribune.com/articles/2004/11/10/news/life/lif01.txt

It's called the "slow food movement" and it brought 5,000 people to Turin, Italy, in October -- including Aubrey Skye from the Standing Rock Reservation in North Dakota.

The conference delegates -- rabbit farmers, cheese producers, date growers, beekeepers, brewers, cattle farmers, salami makers, fermented milk producers and many more -- drank local wines, ate artisanal breads and fresh local foods and networked in an effort to preserve the world's food diversity and protect authentic, traditional foods and food producers. 

In Turin, Skye found not fast food, but orchards, vineyards, greenhouses and gardens, he said.

Skye, one of about 50 American Indian delegates, attended as the community garden coordinator for the Standing Rock Diabetes Program in Fort Yates. He was part of a presentation called "Creating Models for Sustainable Agriculture."

A Hunkpapa Lakota member, Skye knows that type 2 diabetes is at epidemic proportions among American Indians. Experts blame this crisis among Indian people on the change in diet from traditional natural foods such as buffalo, squash, corn, beans, game and berries, to a diet high in sugar, salt, fat and simple carbohydrates.

The diabetes program has established five community gardens on the reservation. Elementary school children help plant seeds in trays and transplant them to the gardens around Memorial Day.

"That gives them hands-on experience, teaches them about soil that connects us to the earth," he said. Traditional heirloom seed varieties are planted -- "little memory banks that are part of our cultural identity," he said.

With the help of youth and sometimes inmates from the jail, Skye tends the garden during the growing season. Gardening promotes nutrition and exercise as part of a healthy lifestyle, Skye said.

"It's good therapy, to be near the plants," he said. "Food is medicine."

In the fall, a harvest festival is served -- buffalo stew, squash, corn and pumpkin pies, prepared by the Fort Yates High School cafeteria staff.

Trying to reintroduce that connection to the earth is not going to happen overnight, he said. "But we're making an impact. Slow foods are the traditional diet that kept us healthy," he said.

The Turin conference -- called "Terra Madre" or Mother Earth -- included many traditional peoples, he said.

Guest speakers included Prince Charles, of Britain, and, from Minnesota, Winona LaDuke and Sarah Alexander, authors of "Food as Medicine."

The slow food movement started in 1986 in response to the opening of a McDonald's in Rome's Piazza Spagna, and since then has grown to 70,000 members, including 150 U.S. chapters with 12,500 members.

Around the world, slow food adherents are networking for the preservation of sustainable, ethnic, authentic, traditional and artisanal foods and producers against what they call the industrialization of food worldwide.

"The one thing everybody had in common -- trying to survive in the face of the agri-industrial complex," he said. "The small farmer can't compete. So they try to find little niches.

"Things are going to have to change sooner or later. If we continue to contaminate water and air, deplete the soil, we will run out of nonrenewable resources."

(Reach Karen Herzog at 250-8267 or krherzog@ndonline.com.)

--- End Message ---




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