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Re: Plants for community garden

  • Subject: Re: [cg] Plants for community garden
  • From: budge@magicaldesk.com
  • Date: Wed, 02 Oct 2002 02:05:14 +0800

I'm afraid that I don't know anything about methyl bromide. Good not to be poisoning the soil, though of course with the heavy irrigation neccessary to grow things in most parts of the west, there's the ongoing issue of the mineralization of soils. Never really understood the mechanism for that, thought I've sure read a lot about it so there must be something to it.

Here, most of the raspberries come from either Oregon or Washington. They're almost always tasteless and usually moldy. As they are extremely expensive - running around $3-4 per pint, they're lots of money for raspberry shaped nothing. If I don't know who picked 'em, I ain't buying 'em. Since my parents overnighted me a box full of cherries fresh from their tree, I'm developing the same problem with cherries too. :-( Good thing the world's best corn grows here. . . ;-)

Pamela



************************************************************
deborah@greencure.org wrote on 10/1/2002
************************************************************
Well what can I say.=) This just started as of last year because our strawberry growers are gearing up for the time (very soon) they can no longer use methyl bromide as a part of their soil prep. I personally haven't tasted them (the annual type) so I can't comment on their flavor but I do like the idea that they will not be poisoning our soil.

I probably won't even have the chance to taste one since it appears they always ship their produce to the mid-west or somewhere. Lucky for me, if I choose to buy raspberries at a store, they most likely will come from some place like Minnesota. It's the same thing for us when it comes to avocados. Here we are, smack dab in the middle of avocado country and if you go to one of our local markets, the avocados come from Mexico or Argentina. Hmmmm, makes a lot of sense. Good thing I know a lot of growers personally. =)

Deborah


They're growing raspberries like ANNUALS???? Well, that explains it. Good grief. They don't even produce well until they've been established for a couple of years. *rolls eyes* Just more proof that my refusal to eat store bought raspberries is a good one!

Growing raspberries as annuals *shakes head* I think the world is coming to an end! ;-)))

Autumn Beauty is a very popular variety here. Several of the local pick your own farms grow them. They taste wonderful - I've been known to go out and spend my birthday picking raspberries and then living on them until they're all gone! Raspberries, even black raspberries, grow wild all over Minnesota. There are families who have been picking the same wild raspberry or wild blueberry patches for generations. Any park here that has a wild wooded section - and most do - has wild raspberries. Course, beating the birds to them is something of a miracle! ;-)

Pamela


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deborah@greencure.org wrote on 9/30/2002
************************************************************

I found out from our local farm advisor that in Ventura California the growers are planting the raspberries like annuals so they come to them already pre-chilled. In the summer months they use a huge floating row covers to raise the temperature a bit since we are on the coast.

One berry that seems to need low chill hours and is treated like a perennial is the variety Autumn Beauty, which is suppose to big and sweet!

Deborah Mills
www.greencure.org


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