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RE: Hunger in America: What's Wrong With This Picture - Lemonaide from Lemons

  • Subject: RE: [cg] Hunger in America: What's Wrong With This Picture - Lemonaide from Lemons
  • From: "Honigman, Adam" Adam.Honigman@Bowne.com
  • Date: Wed, 4 Sep 2002 13:18:21 -0400

John,

Get the media involved and,  if you can,keep your ear open for when this
same mayor is talking about hunger iniatives. IF you can send these
gardeners to this hunger press conference with pictures, etc. to testify, it
might be a good thing. Some handwritten letters from the folks they feed
sent off to this mayor ( and photocopied for your files) might be a good
thing too.  

It's hard sometimes for our employees (and remember,  elected officials are
our employees too) to keep two ideas in their heads at the same time. We
just have to keep reminding them...in public and private. 

Best wishes,
Adam Honigman



-----Original Message-----
From: John Verin [mailto:jverin@Pennhort.org]
Sent: Wednesday, September 04, 2002 1:09 PM
To: community_garden@mallorn.com
Subject: RE: [cg] Hunger in America: What's Wrong With This Picture?


Here in Philly there's a garden tended by 5 men, all 65+ years old, growing
an enormous amount of food for their neighborhood. They also do lots of
volunteering with children in and around the garden, doing meaningful,
esteem-building projects.

Their neighborhood is part of a targeted anti-blight initiative, and our
mayor told them, standing in the garden, that within three years it would be
developed. It is mind boggling.


Paco John Verin
City Wide Coordinator - Philadelphia Green
The Pennsylvania Horticultural Society
100 North 20th Street, 5th floor
Philadelphia, PA  19103-1495
Phone: 215-988-8885; Fax 215-988-8810
http://www.pennsylvaniahorticulturalsociety.org 

> -----Original Message-----
> From: community_garden-admin@mallorn.com
> [mailto:community_garden-admin@mallorn.com]On Behalf Of Honigman, Adam
> Sent: Tuesday, September 03, 2002 3:13 PM
> To: 'community_garden@mallorn.com'
> Subject: [cg] Hunger in America: What's Wrong With This Picture?
> 
> 
> Friends,
> Right now, as community gardeners wait to see what will 
> happen to the 146
> odd community gardens whose fate is being negotiated in the Attorney
> General's lawsuit, this article appeared on page 2 of the NY 
> Daily News (
> the same paper that called community gardeners, "Garden 
> Weasels" in a July
> 2001 editorial.)
> As a community gardener who, as part of a  garden community,  
> delivers a
> decent part of his excess food production to low income seniors on a
> one-to-one basis and to a local food pantry, the proposed 
> destruction of
> community gardens, especially in low-income neighborhoods 
> boggles the mind. 
> Mind you, much of our shortfall is based on economics, the 
> 1400 miles most
> food gets shipped in this country because of our truck based food
> distribution system and the growing centralization and 
> corporatization of
> our agriculture.
> But as a NYC community gardener, whose outdoor recreation 
> feeds people, I
> can only scratch my head at the pending destruction of   
> citizen run open
> green spaces in times that cry out for Victory Gardens.
> Adam Honigman
> Volunteer, Clinton Community Garden
>  
> 
> 
>  
> 
> 
> New York Daily News  
> "Food agencies can't
> feed all in need"
> By OWEN MORITZ
> DAILY NEWS STAFF WRITER 
> Tuesday, September 3rd, 2002 
> 
> New York has a hunger crisis, with food pantries and soup 
> kitchens turning
> away people who need meals, officials of New York's Food Bank said
> yesterday. 
> Food Bank President Lucy Cabrera unveiled a survey showing 
> that one in five
> food pantries and one in six soup kitchens have been more 
> likely to turn
> people away since the Sept. 11 terror attacks. 
> The survey further concluded that one in five people is 
> turning to emergency
> food programs "just to get by," and more than half are 
> children and the
> elderly, she said. 
> Cabrera said she was particularly concerned that "with the city's food
> assistance programs at capacity long before Sept. 11, we 
> don't see an end in
> sight to the ever-growing levels of hunger." 
> Today, leading hunger experts will meet at the Marriott 
> Marquis Hotel to
> chart new strategies. 
> The Food Bank survey also noted that unemployment and 
> homelessness in the
> city are at their highest levels since the organization was 
> founded 20 years
> ago. 
> The Food Bank is the largest of its kind in the country. It 
> provides food
> for more than 200,000 meals served each day by more than 
> 1,000 nonprofit
> community food programs - including soup kitchens, food 
> pantries, shelters,
> low-income day-care centers and senior, youth and 
> rehabilitation centers
> throughout the city. 
> A canvass of the city's emergency food programs by the Food 
> Bank found that
> more than 80% of soup kitchens and food pantries reported an increased
> demand for emergency assistance after 9/11. 
> Demand was especially high in Brooklyn and Manhattan, where 
> 76.3% and 75.6%
> of soup kitchens, respectively, reported medium or high 
> levels of demand
> eight months after the attacks. 
> Those boroughs, the Food Bank said, "experienced a severe and enduring
> increased demand for food." 
> Also troubling the organization was a 25% dropoff in food 
> donations since
> Jan. 1. 
> 
> 
> ______________________________________________________
> The American Community Gardening Association listserve is 
> only one of ACGA's services to community gardeners. To learn 
> more about the ACGA and to find out how to join, please go to 
http://www.communitygarden.org


To post an e-mail to the list:  community_garden@mallorn.com

To subscribe, unsubscribe or change your subscription:
https://secure.mallorn.com/mailman/listinfo/community_garden

______________________________________________________
The American Community Gardening Association listserve is only one of ACGA's
services to community gardeners. To learn more about the ACGA and to find
out how to join, please go to http://www.communitygarden.org


To post an e-mail to the list:  community_garden@mallorn.com

To subscribe, unsubscribe or change your subscription:
https://secure.mallorn.com/mailman/listinfo/community_garden

______________________________________________________
The American Community Gardening Association listserve is only one of ACGA's services to community gardeners. To learn more about the ACGA and to find out how to join, please go to http://www.communitygarden.org


To post an e-mail to the list:  community_garden@mallorn.com

To subscribe, unsubscribe or change your subscription:  https://secure.mallorn.com/mailman/listinfo/community_garden





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