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Re: Viburnum > foundation


Reminds me of the first house I bought in Maryland. Steps leading up to a small cement front porch had some sort of big juniper planted on either side. They'd been hacked back over the years to maintain access to the front door. Never seemed to occur to the former occupants to simply take them out.


On Saturday, February 26, 2005, at 09:33 AM, kmrsy@comcast.net wrote:

I don't know about today's new home landscaping, but sometimes, isn't it
a scream what was chosen for the second-hand home you bought? My house
had just one of those small preformed cement things for a porch with a
wrought iron railing on it. They had placed a yew next to it, which over
20 years had gotten out of scale with the porch, maybe 6x6, and
previously hacked at willy-nilly. We dug it out and hauled it back to a
far corner of the yard and plunked it in. If it survived or not, fine.
Well, today that yew is a good 15 feet tall. Why would they have planted
a shrub that had that potential next to the front steps? I have since
built an 8x15 ft porch and try to choose planting that match the scale.

--
Kitty
neIN, Zone5

-------------- Original message --------------

I'll have to look at those, but you guys are WAY more knowledgeable about
the cultivars of Viburnum than I am clearly. I know V. odotisurum, only
because the idiots who built my house used it as foundation shrubs, HELLO?
Needless to say, I moved them and now they make a great 15 foot high
privacy screen. The other I'm most familiar with is V. tinus. So, I'm
learning a lot from this discussion.

A



[Original Message]
From:
To:
Date: 2/26/2005 12:54:24 AM
Subject: RE: [CHAT] Viburnum

Andrea,

I put a picture of Viburnum plicatum 'Watanabe' in my shrub folder.
There
is also another culitivar called 'Summer Snowflake' that has been in
garden
centers for a few years.

Chris
Long Island, NY
Zone 7a (Average min temp 50 - 00)
http://photos.yahoo.com/chrispnpt

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Island Jim
Southwest Florida
27.0 N, 82.4 W
Hardiness Zone 10
Heat Zone 10
Minimum 30 F [-1 C]
Maximum 100 F [38 C]

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