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RE: Jim-Plumeria

  • Subject: RE: Jim-Plumeria
  • From: "andreah" <andreah@hargray.com>
  • Date: Wed, 30 Sep 2009 11:17:06 -0400

Fabulous! Thanks a bunch.
A


-----Original Message-----
From: owner-gardenchat@hort.net [mailto:owner-gardenchat@hort.net] On Behalf
Of james singer
Sent: Wednesday, September 30, 2009 10:59 AM
To: gardenchat@hort.net
Subject: Re: [CHAT] Jim-Plumeria

I used to prune mine [I had three or four] whenever their growth began  
to annoy me. Yes, they can get quite unruly as they get older and  
larger. I doubt it will send the plant into dormancy. The first thing  
I would do with the cuttings is stop the bleeding--they bleed like  
crazy. You can use almost any fine material, like peat moss, for that;  
I used RooTone because it has a fungicide in it. Then, like a cactus  
cutting, I'd just let them rest in the shade for a week or so until  
the cut heals. Then I'd pot them up. They'll root pretty quickly. You  
can also store them in a cool place--one of the vegetable drawers in  
the fridge or in a bucket of sawdust in the garage--for a long time;  
just keep them dry so they don't rot. The ones that you see for sale  
at flower shows have been dipped in some kind of water-soluble wax,  
probably the same stuff they treat supermarket apples with. They seem  
to last forever.

On Sep 30, 2009, at 6:58 AM, andreah wrote:

> Jim-can I prune my Plumeria now? It is out of control. Will that  
> send it
> into dormancy? And if I do, what should I do with the cuttings since  
> it's
> warm here for several more months?
>
> THANKS!
> A
>
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>

Inland Jim
Willamette Valley

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