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  • Subject: RE: [iris-photos]NOID:ID's
  • From: "Harold Peters" harold@directcon.net
  • Date: Fri, 2 Sep 2005 20:34:43 -0700
  • Importance: Normal

Did you use bone meal or some other organic amendment in your bed preparation? If so, expect more nocturnal digging until the bed is adequately leached.
Harold Peters
Beautiful View Iris Garden
2048 Hickok Road
El Dorado Hills, CA 95762
harold@directcon.net  www.beautiful-view-iris.com
-----Original Message-----
From: iris-photos@yahoogroups.com [mailto:iris-photos@yahoogroups.com]On Behalf Of Pearl Doyle
Sent: Friday, September 02, 2005 6:25 PM
To: iris-photos@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [iris-photos]NOID:ID's

I was once told I could make a living wholesaling irises if I planted and maintained 5 acres or more.   It's VERY possible that some of the smaller or busier wholesalers aren't real careful about names and garden records?  I know one or two that might have this problem.  Once every year or two I find an iris growing in a spot I don't remember planting it!  I've either mixed in a rhizome or forgot to note one on the map!  Imagine what would happen if one were growing large quantities for wholesale and forgot to make a notation.
Betty, factor in accidents of nature and the problem snowballs. I came home tonight to find the new bed I had carefully planted and labled and mapped, in chaos. Either the resident armadillo or my neighbor's dog had rearranged the whole thing. Most of these are irises I have growing elsewhere so I will be able to recognize them when they bloom.


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