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Re: Dracunculus

  • Subject: Re: Dracunculus
  • From: Sheldon Hatheway <sfhatheway@yahoo.com>
  • Date: Mon, 22 Sep 2008 08:46:52 -0700 (PDT)

Don't know about yours.  There seems to be some variability in these plants.  The only experience I've had with Dracunculus is with the ones I have in the garden.  They are all from the same clone that I originally rescued from a deteriorating landscape back in the early 80s.  The lady who owned the property said she had gotten it about 20+ years earlier.  Mine emerge in late winter/early spring, grow to about 3' tall by mid-summer when they flower.  They begin to die back in early fall.  Aside from mulching with some grass clippings during the summer, I don't do anything to them.

Sheldon Hatheway
Canby OR

----- Original Message ----
From: E.Vincent Morano <ironious2@yahoo.com>
To: Discussion of aroids <aroid-l@gizmoworks.com>
Sent: Sunday, September 21, 2008 12:52:29 PM
Subject: Re: [Aroid-l] Dracunculus

I dont know what you are doing different but mine start waking up in the mid to late winter then flower in the spring and die back by mid to late spring. Is that normal?

--- On Fri, 9/19/08, Sheldon Hatheway <sfhatheway@yahoo.com> wrote:
From: Sheldon Hatheway <sfhatheway@yahoo.com>
Subject: Re: [Aroid-l] Dracunculus
To: "Discussion of aroids" <aroid-l@gizmoworks.com>
Date: Friday, September 19, 2008, 10:36 PM

Dear Anna,

Congratulations on your purchase.  Here in Canby, Oregon, USA, zone 7B I grow mine in the ground about 6" deep.  They've been in the ground for about 50 years, during which time they have been dug, divided, and moved four times.  My soil is sandy so even though it rains a lot during the winter and spring, I have had no problems with rot.  I keep them watered during the growing season and don't worry about them after that.  My wife mulches everything with leaves and grass clippings which is all the fertilizer they get.  At this time they are sporting large, bright orange infructescences which contain hundreds of individual berries, each containing 1-3 seeds.  The birds like to eat them when they are thoroughly ripe.  Mine only have a very mild odor (either that or my nose is shorting out) and the huge purple inflorescences are so beautiful!  I can hardly wait until next summer for them to bloom again.

Best of luck with yours.

Sheldon Hatheway
Canby OR USA

----- Original Message ----
From: anna haigh <anabaena@london.com>
To: aroid-l@gizmoworks.com
Sent: Friday, September 19, 2008 8:33:04 AM
Subject: [Aroid-l] Dracunculus

Dear all,
I have juust bought a Dracunculus vulgaris tuber, which I believe to be hardy where I live in the UK. I just wondered whether anybody had any experience with this and how to get the best out of it.
I'm excited to see how it will do.
All the best,

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