Re: Synandrospadix vermitoxicus


-----Original Message-----
From: Steve Marak <samarak@arachne.uark.edu>
To: ju-bo@msn.com <ju-bo@msn.com>
Date: Friday, September 11, 1998 10:57 AM
Subject: Re: Synandrospadix vermitoxicus

>>Since I am usually the one who initiates discussion of S. vermitoxicus on
Aroid-L, I have held my tongue - electronically speacking - for a couple
of days to give others the chance to respond. Alas, no one has, so I feel
compelled to post something.

..

I've tried several times to get more information about the temperature and
climate extremes in its native range, without much success. I've never
gotten seeds from my plant, and would like to very much because I want
some additional plants. I did put one offset outside for the winter a
couple of years ago, but results were inconclusive, because I got
impatient and started looking for it, and the tuber suffered serious
shovel blight during the exploration. (It was intact - i.e., not rotted,
and seemed healthy - but had not started growth even though it was 60 days
later than when the plant in the greenhouse had put up leaves. Or rather
it was apparently intact before I started poking around.)

I'd certainly be interested in any information you have about the habitat,
especially the temperature ranges at the extremes.

Steve


-- Steve Marak
-- samarak@arachne.uark.edu<<
<<
Dear Steve,
I enjoyed your post, and even though I do not grow this species, I am
responding to your final para. concerning temp. ranges.
Many years ago I worked for a short time on the plains of S. W. Bolivia.,
close to the mountains, near a small village called Sunchal; it was on the
train line to Argentina, as far as I can remember about 25 kms N. of the
border.   Apart from a couple of oil rigs, their main "industry" was
producing rail-road ties from the surrounding jungle (this looked like a
northern Florida oak-type forest), and making charcoal with the left over
branches, etc.  Very poor people, who worked for the main land owner/job
producer, and were beholden to him for everything, including potable water
from his well, which he kept fenced in, and opened the gate when they
cleaned up the area or did various chores.   Sad.   I was there during their
winter, and though the days were warm and generally sunny, the nights were
COLD, down to almost or at freezing!  Lynn hannon`s post says her plant was
collected at 5000' plus, so it probably gets cold as heck up there!
Hope that this is of help, and good luck.
Cheers,
Julius
ju-bo@msn.com







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