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Re: allotment/community garden

  • Subject: [cg] Re: allotment/community garden
  • From: "Karen Jones" k.jones@uwinnipeg.ca
  • Date: Thu, 28 Jul 2005 19:32:52 -0500

Indeed there is a huge difference between allotment and community
gardens. I don't think we have to look to Europe to figure it out.
Allotments are alloted by someone. Community gardens are claimed by the
community and gardened as a community effort. Novel idea in countries
where individual ownership is the norm. Allotment gardeners expect not
to have to do any weeding. Not to have to do any grant writing or
organizing. Alot of community gardening is about protecting the garden
itself. Through politics (which most gardeners justifibly hate doing, it
takes them out of the garden)Municipalities tend to promote allotment
gardens because they feel that they are easier to control because the
city owns them. Community gardens are often owned (if they are lucky) by
bigger umbrellas like churches and other community organizations. The
word plot is anethma to community gardens. it signifies veg plots and is
often used by municipalities in leiu of gardens, using the charity model
of 'look at the virtuous poor growing veg in their veg plot. Some of
these types of arrangements actually forbid the planting of flowering
plants in this city's allotments.   This city  is in the deep dark ages.
A community garden co-ordinator employed by the government recently told
me that community gardens are not about gardening. Heaven forbid that
the gardeners should ever be empowered by learning something about
gardens, she might be out of a job, she thinks. Wrong again. Allotment
gardens employ the charity model. I think that community gardens reach
out beyond the borders of the garden to empower the gardeners and make
the community stronger. Allotments can exist out in the middle of
nowhere and still accomplish what they set out to do. Community gardens
typically are in urban settings. I think. This is, after all, not the
American Allotment Garden site. 
When replying, please edit your Subject line so it is more specific than
"Re: Contents of community_garden digest..."


Today's Topics:

  1. MSP Airport to Middlebrook by Public Transortation (Diane Dodge)
  2. c.g. or allotment? (Kristin Faurest)
  3. RE: c.g. or allotment? (Betsy Johnson)
  4. RE: c.g. or allotment? (Jack Hale)
  5. Re: c.g. or allotment? (Libby J. Goldstein)

--__--__--

Message: 1
From: "Diane Dodge" <dianefaydodge@hotmail.com>
To: community_garden@mallorn.com
Date: Wed, 27 Jul 2005 12:47:24 -0500
Subject: [cg] MSP Airport to Middlebrook by Public Transortation

OK Folks, the skinny on fares from the airport to use with the route I
sent 
yesterday:

Base fare (local service, non-rush hours) $1.50(includes transfers for 2
1/2 
hrs)

Local service, rush hours* $2.00(ditto on transfers)

* Rush Hours: Monday Friday 6 to 9 a.m. and 3 to 6:30 p.m.

AND---if you're an old fart like me and have a medicare card, you can
ride 
during non-rush hours for half a buck(ditto on transfers)

What a deal...        www.metrotransit.org

Diane


--__--__--

Message: 2
Reply-To: faurestk@mail.datanet.hu
From: "Kristin Faurest" <kfaurest@hotmail.com>
To: community_garden@mallorn.com
Date: Thu, 28 Jul 2005 09:00:42 +0000
Subject: [cg] c.g. or allotment?

Dear everyone,

I know i can always count on this listserver for brilliant answers, so
here goes. I am in the process of finishing a dissertation on community
gardens, and am trying to come up with an intelligent but simple
explanation of what distinguishes a community garden from a European
allotment. Some distinctions that I have read suggest that the
difference
is that allotments are individual parcels and community gardens are not,
but I know that that isn't at all accurate, either. There's no
distinctive socioeconomic group that either serves more than the other,
as far as I know, and European allotment gardens often function as
social
centers or to help new immigrants become part of their new home just the
way community gardens do.  

I know that allotment gardens are more government-supported and less of
a
bottom-up grassroots effort than community gardens, which is a subtle
difference but the only really consistent distinction I can figure out.

I would be very grateful for anyone's insights. Is the government's role
the only real difference? Or should they be considered two different
entities, or one a subtype of the other?

thank you so much.

best,

Kristin Faurest, Budapest


--__--__--

Message: 3
From: "Betsy Johnson" <betsy@bgjohnson.com>
To: <faurestk@mail.datanet.hu>, "ACGA Listserve"
<community_garden@mallorn.com>
Subject: RE: [cg] c.g. or allotment?
Date: Thu, 28 Jul 2005 09:40:17 -0400

Because no two community gardens are the same and no two allotments are
the same, it is impossible to generalize differences.  Based on the
allotments I've visited in Berlin, an allotment may be generally larger
than most community garden plots.  As a result, these allotment had
small cabins on the plots as well as garden space.  While a community
garden may have a gazebo, tool shed, or even a small building, each
individual plot does not.  In terms of government involvement, that
varies as much among community gardens as it does among allotment.

Others can add more.  Best to hear from the European perspective. 

Betsy Johnson
Interim Executive Director
American Community Gardening Assoc.
877-275-2242  betsyjohnson@communitygarden.org

-----Original Message-----
From: community_garden-admin@mallorn.com
[mailto:community_garden-admin@mallorn.com] On Behalf Of Kristin Faurest
Sent: Thursday, July 28, 2005 5:01 AM
To: community_garden@mallorn.com
Subject: [cg] c.g. or allotment?

Dear everyone,

I know i can always count on this listserver for brilliant answers, so
here goes. I am in the process of finishing a dissertation on community
gardens, and am trying to come up with an intelligent but simple
explanation of what distinguishes a community garden from a European
allotment. Some distinctions that I have read suggest that the
difference
is that allotments are individual parcels and community gardens are not,
but I know that that isn't at all accurate, either. There's no
distinctive socioeconomic group that either serves more than the other,
as far as I know, and European allotment gardens often function as
social
centers or to help new immigrants become part of their new home just the
way community gardens do.  

I know that allotment gardens are more government-supported and less of
a
bottom-up grassroots effort than community gardens, which is a subtle
difference but the only really consistent distinction I can figure out.

I would be very grateful for anyone's insights. Is the government's role
the only real difference? Or should they be considered two different
entities, or one a subtype of the other?

thank you so much.

best,

Kristin Faurest, Budapest


______________________________________________________
The American Community Gardening Association listserve is only one of
ACGA's services to community gardeners. To learn more about the ACGA and
to find out how to join, please go to http://www.communitygarden.org


To post an e-mail to the list:  community_garden@mallorn.com

To subscribe, unsubscribe or change your subscription:
https://secure.mallorn.com/mailman/listinfo/community_garden


--__--__--

Message: 4
From: "Jack Hale" <jackh@knoxparks.org>
To: <community_garden@mallorn.com>
Subject: RE: [cg] c.g. or allotment?
Date: Thu, 28 Jul 2005 09:50:23 -0400

The most consistent difference is that if you are standing in an
allotment
garden, the Atlantic Ocean is usually to the west.  For community
gardens,
the Atlantic is usually to the east.
You might also say that the allotment garden movement is much older than
the
community garden movement.  I hear there are allotments that have been
around for hundreds of years.  In the U.S., the earliest community
gardens
were developed in the early 1900's - typically victory gardens during
World
War I.  I don't know if any of those have survived to this day.  There
are
some children's gardens in Cleveland that are about that old, I think.

Jack N. Hale
Executive Director
Knox Parks Foundation
75 Laurel Street
Hartford, CT 06106
860/951-7694
f860/951-7244


-----Original Message-----
From: community_garden-admin@mallorn.com
[mailto:community_garden-admin@mallorn.com]On Behalf Of Kristin Faurest
Sent: Thursday, July 28, 2005 5:01 AM
To: community_garden@mallorn.com
Subject: [cg] c.g. or allotment?

Dear everyone,

I know i can always count on this listserver for brilliant answers, so
here goes. I am in the process of finishing a dissertation on community
gardens, and am trying to come up with an intelligent but simple
explanation of what distinguishes a community garden from a European
allotment. Some distinctions that I have read suggest that the
difference
is that allotments are individual parcels and community gardens are not,
but I know that that isn't at all accurate, either. There's no
distinctive socioeconomic group that either serves more than the other,
as far as I know, and European allotment gardens often function as
social
centers or to help new immigrants become part of their new home just the
way community gardens do.

I know that allotment gardens are more government-supported and less of
a
bottom-up grassroots effort than community gardens, which is a subtle
difference but the only really consistent distinction I can figure out.

I would be very grateful for anyone's insights. Is the government's role
the only real difference? Or should they be considered two different
entities, or one a subtype of the other?

thank you so much.

best,

Kristin Faurest, Budapest


______________________________________________________
The American Community Gardening Association listserve is only one of
ACGA's
services to community gardeners. To learn more about the ACGA and to
find
out how to join, please go to http://www.communitygarden.org


To post an e-mail to the list:  community_garden@mallorn.com

To subscribe, unsubscribe or change your subscription:
https://secure.mallorn.com/mailman/listinfo/community_garden


--__--__--

Message: 5
Cc: <community_garden@mallorn.com>
From: "Libby J. Goldstein" <libby@igc.org>
Subject: Re: [cg] c.g. or allotment?
Date: Thu, 28 Jul 2005 11:53:19 -0400
To: "Jack Hale" <jackh@knoxparks.org>

Jack,


Actually, Philadelphia had a "Vacant Lot Improvement" program in the 
late 19th Century. It provided plots on vacant land (I think they were 
1/7 acre) so poor people who were victims of a great depression then to 
grow their own food.

I have a piece on it at City Farmer.

Libby




--__--__--

______________________________________________________
The American Community Gardening Association listserve is only one of
ACGA's services to community gardeners. To learn more about the ACGA and
to find out how to join, please go to http://www.communitygarden.org

To post an e-mail to the list:  community_garden@mallorn.com

To subscribe, unsubscribe or change your subscription: 
https://secure.mallorn.com/mailman/listinfo/community_garden


End of community_garden Digest


______________________________________________________
The American Community Gardening Association listserve is only one of ACGA's services to community gardeners. To learn more about the ACGA and to find out how to join, please go to http://www.communitygarden.org


To post an e-mail to the list:  community_garden@mallorn.com

To subscribe, unsubscribe or change your subscription:  https://secure.mallorn.com/mailman/listinfo/community_garden





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