hort.net Seasonal photo, (c) 2006 Christopher P. Lindsey, All Rights Reserved: do not copy
articles | gallery of plants | blog | tech blog | plant profiles | patents | mailing lists | top stories | links | shorturl service | tom clothier's archive0
 Navigation
Articles
Gallery of Plants
Blog
Tech Blog
Plant Profiles
Patents
Mailing Lists
    FAQ
    Netiquette
    Search ALL lists
    Search help
    Subscription info
Top Stories
Links
sHORTurl service
Tom Clothier's Archive
 Top Stories
Disease could hit Britain's trees hard

Ten of the best snowdrop cultivars

Plant protein database helps identify plant gene functions

Dendroclimatologists record history through trees

Potato beetle could be thwarted through gene manipulation

Hawaii expands coffee farm quarantine

Study explains flower petal loss

Unauthorized use of a plant doesn't invalidate it's patent

RSS story archive

RE: FW: Help!

  • Subject: RE: [cg] FW: Help!
  • From: "Honigman, Adam" <Adam.Honigman@Bowne.com>
  • Date: Thu, 1 Nov 2001 11:49:40 -0500

Carol,

The website for the 150' x100' garden (.4 of an acre)  where I volunteer in
NYC, The Clinton Community Garden,may have a few ideas that you can draw
upon in your garden planning. This is the link for our website, which is in
the process of being worked on again. Check back in a week or so and there
should be more information available on it.   
http://www.clintoncommunitygarden.org

Garden author, Cynthia Van Hazinga talked to a number of American Community
Gardening Association members before she wrote her piece, "Grow Your Own
Community" in the March/April 2001 New Age Journal. I will send you a copy
of the article via snail mail to share with your planning group at the
address appended to your e-mail

Her description of our garden, with my addtions in brackets:

"The Clinton Community Garden in New York City's infamous Hell's Kitchen
neighborhood is a model of urban transformation. When the garden was started
in 1978, says garden activist Honigman, "we walked in on a dead junkie and
three rusted cars."  Today 2,000 [actually now 2,500 +) key-holders have
access to the pretty front garden where beds of flowers and herbs (available
for tasting) surround a patch of lawn.  Devoted gardeners tend 108 tiny (4x6
feet) plots in the rear garden, some of which are specially designed to be
acessible to disabled and wheelchair-bound people.  Amazingly, the Clinton
Community Garden rambles - a neat trick in a space only 100 x 150 feet
[basically the footprint of five old-law tenments and their back yards].
There are mature shade trees [spring flowering magnolia, apple, doublas fir
and maple]a native-plant garden [we call it our Native American bed, we also
have islands of perennials, roses, dahlias, etc. all tended by volunteers]
and a beehive.  Migratory birds swoop overhead. There's even a vine-shaded
arbor with plenty of seats inside - a space for dance concerts, public
readings and weddings."

Because it is a community run space, we have all sorts of gatherings on a
regular basis at the Clinton Community Garden ( we recently did a big
fundraiser for the 57 firemen who were lost at the World Trade Center) kids
birthday parties, memorial services and weddings for neighborhood residents
who need only fill out an events application.

Because of its' extensive plantings, the Clinton Community Garden does not
permit ball playing, running or rough games - it has pleasant garden paths
and benches. We do have a children's gardening program which consists of one
of our front beds which is filled with sunflowers and annuals every summer.
The garden which has an agreement for keyholders is a public, specific use
place like, lets say, a public library where certain norms of behavior are
expected ( i.e., no drugs, boom boxes, urination, etc...) 

Your community probably has lots of places where people can play basketball,
baseball or football and several running tracks. A community garden, like
the one described above might be something your community may take interest
in creating and supporting.  

The American Community Gardening website http://www.communitygarden.org is
filled with all kinds of wonderful start-up information and hints on
everything from garden governance to dealing with rats in your compost. The
links to garden groups and greening organizations are truly marvelous. Once
you are in the process, your group should consider joining the ACGA, which
has marvelous conferences, materials and a wealth of master gardeners in
its' membership.


If your community members would be interested in exploring more specific
details about the Clinton Community Garden please e-mail me back directly at
adam.honigman@bowne.com or Adam36055@aol.com.

Best wishes,
Adam Honigman

  
-----Original Message-----
From: Laura Berman [mailto:laura@foodshare.net]
Sent: Thursday, November 01, 2001 10:56 AM
To: ACGA listserve
Subject: [cg] FW: Help!


Can someone please help her? She isn't subscribed to the listserve so you
will have to answer her directly.
Laura

----------
> From: "Carol Davis" <cdwater@icnt.net>
> Organization: USPW
> Reply-To: "Carol Davis" <cdwater@icnt.net>
> Date: Tue, 30 Oct 2001 11:59:17 -0000
> To: <laura@foodshare.net>
> Subject: Help!
> 
> Hi there, 
> I am one of a group of neighbors in Marin County California, whose houses
> surround a 1+ acre field that we would like to see planted with native
> species, wildlife restoring plants, birds and butterfly habitat, compost &
> natural soil building, and a small community garden. Unfortunately, the
county
> has something else in mind along with some people in the larger community.
> They want to see a "park" in the conventional sense: picnic benches, play
> structure, oleander, & 80% turf. We are in the process  of coming up with
an
> alternative design for the park, and of trying to increase our numbers and
> persuade a majority of people in the surrounding community, that wildlife
> habitat will be more harmonious, gratifying & inviting.  Our neighborhood
> group does not have the funds that the county has for slick blueprints
etc,
> but we want to present photos, a rough design, and sound concept.
> Please let us know if you can help us. I wonder if you have any staff that
you
> could send to one of our neighborhood association meetings, to give a
> presentation, or if you would have any input for the actual design. Also,
Is
> there a community Gardening Group, Coalition, umbrella organization
Alliance
> or anything in this area?
> Thanks so much for your wonderful work!
> Carol Davis
> 64 Vendola Drive
> San Rafael, CA 94903
> 415-479-9384  Wk.415-461-4045
> 


_______________________________________________
The American Community Gardening Association listserve is only one of the
organization's services for community gardens. To learn more about the ACGA
and to find out how to join, please go to www.communitygarden.org.

community_garden maillist  -  community_garden@mallorn.com
https://secure.mallorn.com/mailman/listinfo/community_garden

_______________________________________________
The American Community Gardening Association listserve is only one of the organization's services for community gardens. To learn more about the ACGA and to find out how to join, please go to www.communitygarden.org.

community_garden maillist  -  community_garden@mallorn.com
https://secure.mallorn.com/mailman/listinfo/community_garden





 © 1995-2015 Mallorn Computing, Inc.All Rights Reserved.
Our Privacy Statement
Other Mailing lists | Author Index | Date Index | Subject Index | Thread Index