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RE: Angiopteris


Hi Frank

Yes they were very slow and think it was a few years.  I would prick out the
sporelings that were big enough, then wait to see if there were more.  Some
gave me 2 or more every year for a few years.

The Mycorrhiza is ok in the beginning and may not need  any more, but I
didn't take any chances.  
There are quite a few ferns need this fungi and I believe many more ferns
not yet recorded need it too.  This includes treeferns.
I have 10 or so treeferns with Psilotum nudum now growing in them, so it is
around and we don't know it is there.

Collecting spore from them is perhaps as difficult as any fern, you need to
be there at the right time before the sporangium has dehisced.  I seem to
remember the cooler months was always the wrong time of the year.  Simply
remember, if the sporangium is 'fluffy', your perhaps too late.  

In Calder's book, he mentions Carnarvon Gorge, amazingly there, they were
growing in a foot of mud deposited on rock under a rock ledge.  
On Frazer Island they were in a creek growing partly submerged in 12 inches
of crystal clear water in white sand.
Generally up in the tropics they were under the canopy in normal litter
topped soil. 

You can grow them from Auricles, or ears each side of the stipe.  Remove the
auricle as much as you can, bury upwards in sphagnum moss and keep warm and
moist.  

I believe the growth of new ferns beside the main base is from the auricles
which have been pushed down into the soil by the centre's  outwards
expansion with new growth as it swells with age.  If you have one, try
packing potting mix around the fern, new ferns will appear in a year or so.

Some more comments on my web site on
http://lm.net.au/~kerogers/page15.html

Some botanists in the past have referred to A. evicta as one species or 200.

As a collector there are a few that are quite different visually,  have seen
some of Reggie's images of some in the past.

As for Dr Calder Chaffey's book, he is a retired medico, it is a very well
presented on almost 200 Australian ferns with information gathered from
collectors around Australia (I made page 96!) and from his own practical
experience in his own unique garden.  He writes for Australian Plants
Society who often produce books on groups of plants that would not normally
be financial successful.

Keith

Keith Rogers
Mannum South Australia

Keith's Fern Page is at
www.lm.net.au/~kerogers/

Supporting the Fern Society of South Australia inc on
www.users.chariot.net.au/~saufern/

-----Original Message-----
From: owner-ferns@hort.net [mailto:owner-ferns@hort.net] On Behalf Of Frank
Sent: Monday, 2 January 2006 11:59 PM
To: ferns@hort.net
Subject: RE: [ferns] Angiopteris

Hello Keith,

that sounds very good. How long did you have to wait for? I have read on
some resources that these prothalli are very long-living (for several years)
and that germination and fertilisation on the gametophyte takes a lot of
time (several years?). On the same source it was said that they are always
asscoiated with mycorrhiza fungi, which I think is not typical for other
ferns?
Do you or somebody else have harvested spores from Angiopteris? I tried it
several times by picking pinnae with mature (well I thoguht they are
mature)sori and have put them in an envelope. But after drying almost no
detectable spores have been released. I tried it several times - always the
same result. Do I miss the correct maturity stage or is there a different
mechanism of spore release compared to the leptosporangiate ferns? I just
rubbed the sori off and sowed them completely on the substrate. I hope this
will work.

Thank you all for your hints and the book search engines - very useful also
for other books.

Best

Frank

> --- Urspr|ngliche Nachricht ---
> Von: "Keith Rogers" <kerogers@iprimus.com.au>
> An: <ferns@hort.net>
> Betreff: RE: [ferns] Angiopteris
> Datum: Mon, 2 Jan 2006 23:13:14 +1030
> 
> Hi Frank
> 
> Did have some success a few years ago with Marattia, used my normal 
> propagating mix and waited.  Appears they and Angiopteris can have 
> huge prothallus, some here were 50mm long.
> 
> Th
ey did not need any Mycorrhiza to get them to 30mm sporelings, but I did
> add some to the 75mm I potted them into.
> 
> Keith
> 
> Keith Rogers
> Mannum South Australia
> 
> Keith's Fern Page is at
> www.lm.net.au/~kerogers/
> 
> Supporting the Fern Society of South Australia inc on 
> www.users.chariot.net.au/~saufern/
> 
> 
> -----Original Message-----
> From: owner-ferns@hort.net [mailto:owner-ferns@hort.net] On Behalf Of 
> Frank
> Sent: Monday, 2 January 2006 8:24 PM
> To: ferns@hort.net
> Subject: Re: [ferns] Angiopteris
> 
> Hello David,
> 
> thanks for your information. Unfortunately the book is out of print...
> best
> 
> Frank
> 
> 
> > --- Urspr|ngliche Nachricht ---
> > Von: David Nicholls <nicholls@u030.aone.net.au>
> > An: ferns@hort.net
> > Betreff: Re: [ferns] Angiopteris
> > Datum: Fri, 30 Dec 2005 21:46:02 +1100
> > 
> > FrankBln wrote:
> > > Dear members,
> > > 
> > > Currently I am interested in the development of Angiopteris ferns.
> > > Especially I am interested in the prothalli development. I tried 
> > > to get
> > some
> > > information on the internet to find out how they look like etc, 
> > > but
> > couldnt
> > > find more detailed descriptions. Does someone of you know an 
> > > internet resource (or book) with more detailed information about 
> > > these ferns? Any hint is appreciated. Is there even someone with 
> > > photographs of
> > gametophytes?
> > 
> > Calder H. Chaffey's book "Australian Ferns - Growing them Successfully" 
> > has useful information on growing Angiopteris evecta
> > 
> > DN
> > 
> > --
> > ____________________________________
> > 
> > David Nicholls
> > Nicholls Communications
> > http://www.dcnicholls.com/
> > ____________________________________
> > 
> > --------------------------------------------------------------------
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> > message text UNSUBSCRIBE FERNS
> > 
> 
> --
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