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Re: Tell-Tale TC

Glen Williams wrote:
> >How does one tell whether a purchased plant is TC or grown from divisions?
> >And I'm looking forward to the answers to Sheila's question about TC vs.
> >division..
> >
> >Gerry:
>    The younger TCs are pretty easy to spot. There is much more fine root
> mass, sometimes multiple plants which can be carefully separated without
> cutting, and a clearer symmetry to second year TC plants.Divisions are
> often asymmetrical for a few months. Of course there is no confusing a
> division taken from a mature plant,  and you do  initially have a cut crown
> or bud to indicate that it is a division. None of that on TC. A TC grown on
> for 2 or 3 years becomes  impossible to identify as such, although there
> are some arguments about growth rates  and the appearance of mature
> leaves.With hostas which are fairly stoloniferous it might be a lot more
> difficult to make a determination as to whether it is a "cutting" or TC.
> The clue will almost always be the fine root mass.I would be interested to
> know what professional TCers would have to say.
> Glen Williams
> >
> >
> ---------------------------------------------------------------------
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I have seen situations, where as much as 3 to 4 years after Tc, plants 
are still not setteling  This mostly occures on variegated plants, and 
might follow pretty much the same pattern on "naturals"  With any Hosta , 
no matter weather Tc or natural, take off any "sporting" section as soon 
as you can.
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