hort.net Seasonal photo, (c) 2006 Christopher P. Lindsey, All Rights Reserved: do not copy
articles | gallery of plants | blog | tech blog | plant profiles | patents | mailing lists | top stories | links | shorturl service | tom clothier's archive0
 Navigation
Articles
Gallery of Plants
Blog
Tech Blog
Plant Profiles
Patents
Mailing Lists
    FAQ
    Netiquette
    Search ALL lists
    Search help
    Subscription info
Top Stories
Links
sHORTurl service
Tom Clothier's Archive
 Top Stories
Disease could hit Britain's trees hard

Ten of the best snowdrop cultivars

Plant protein database helps identify plant gene functions

Dendroclimatologists record history through trees

Potato beetle could be thwarted through gene manipulation

Hawaii expands coffee farm quarantine

Study explains flower petal loss

Unauthorized use of a plant doesn't invalidate it's patent

RSS story archive

RE: Collard Greens


Yes, Adam, tis true,
Brassicas are sweetened by frost. As are carrots.
Why do people dislike store-bought Brussels sprouts?
Because they are grown in California where there is no real frost (and
possibly in nutrient-depleted soils).
Organically grown Brussels allowed to endure a frost or two are tender and
sweet! MMmm!

I'm willing to bet that people would eat more vegetables if they were grown
properly, locally, harvested properly and tasted like vegetables!

Live from the Garden of Yum,
John


> -----Original Message-----
> From: community_garden-admin@mallorn.com
> [mailto:community_garden-admin@mallorn.com]On Behalf Of Honigman, Adam
> Sent: Monday, August 21, 2000 11:57 AM
> To: 'AMCNALLY@rubbermaid.com'; community_garden@mallorn.com
> Subject: RE: [cg] Collard Greens
>
>
> Ammey:
> By all means take a few leaves and enjoy them now but keep the plant going
> (some gardeners in our NYC garden keep them going until frost.) A good
> friend of mine ( whose family  knows from collard greens)
> insists that they
> are sweeter by the end of the season and have special medicinal qualities.
>
> Best wishes,
> Adam
>
>
> > -----Original Message-----
> > From:	AMCNALLY@rubbermaid.com [SMTP:AMCNALLY@rubbermaid.com]
> > Sent:	Monday, August 21, 2000 11:27 AM
> > To:	community_garden@mallorn.com
> > Subject:	[cg] Collard Greens
> >
> > I live in NE Ohio and have attempted to grow Collard Greens this Summer.
> > I
> > planted them Memorial Day Weekend and they are really big and leafy now,
> > but
> > I'm not sure exactly when I should pick them to cook.  Please advise how
> > long I should wait or how they should look before I cook them.
> >
> > Thanks,
> >
> >
> > Ammey L. McNally
> > Rubbermaid Home Products
> > amcnally@rubbermaid.com
> > PH:  330-202-5877
> > FX:  330-202-5441
> >
> >
> >
> > _______________________________________________
> > community_garden maillist  -  community_garden@mallorn.com
> > https://secure.mallorn.com/mailman/listinfo/community_garden
>
> _______________________________________________
> community_garden maillist  -  community_garden@mallorn.com
> https://secure.mallorn.com/mailman/listinfo/community_garden
>


_______________________________________________
community_garden maillist  -  community_garden@mallorn.com
https://secure.mallorn.com/mailman/listinfo/community_garden





 © 1995-2015 Mallorn Computing, Inc.All Rights Reserved.
Our Privacy Statement
Other Mailing lists | Author Index | Date Index | Subject Index | Thread Index